quotes tagged with 'NealMaxwell'

Imagine yourself as a living house. God comes in to rebuild that house. At first, perhaps, you can understand what He is doing. He is getting the drains right and stopping the leaks in the roof and so on: you knew that those jobs needed doing and so you are not surprised. But presently he starts knocking the house about in a way that hurts abominably and does not seem to make sense. What on earth is He up to? The explanation is that He is building quite a different house from the one you thought of--throwing out a new wing here, putting on an extra floor there, running up towers, making courtyards. You thought you were going to be made into a decent little cottage: but He is building a palace. He intends to come and live in it Himself.
Author: C. S. Lewis, Source: http://speeches.byu.edu/reader/reader.php?id=1156Saved by ritchieheber in refinement growing deification NealMaxwell LivingHouse 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]
However few we may be, we must hold up to the world the true picture of mankind, "things as they really are" and "as they really are to come."
Author: Neal A. Maxwell, Source: "Family Perspectives", BYU Devotional, January 15, 1974Saved by ritchieheber in perspective NealMaxwell moralrelativism 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]
Isn't it interesting that at a time when patriotism is called into question, that some fail to realize that one cannot really have a sense of country without a sense of kinship, that one cannot have a sense of kinship without family, and one cannot have a sense of family without parents?
Author: Neal A. Maxwell, Source: "Family Perspectives", BYU Devotional, January 15, 1974Saved by ritchieheber in patriotism society family kinship country NealMaxwell 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]
We are witnesses to a rather bizarre game of human chess in which there is strange value placed on the various pieces on the chess game. The kings and queens, the parents, are thought of as being inconsequential; the castles, or homes, get traded off for pawns with great casualness; the bishops, which might represent religion, remain largely unused in responding to the challenge. Yet, in the midst of this strange pattern of play, the world wonders why it cannot checkmate human misery.
Author: Neal A. Maxwell, Source: "Family Perspectives", BYU Devotional, January 15, 1974Saved by ritchieheber in society chess misery family home NealMaxwell 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]
Analogously, we have far too many lonely humans foraging on deficient "homesteads" and too many governmental programs which attempt abortively to substitute a less efficient system of helping humans than the home; it is the home that we must rescue, repair, and sustain. Only when homes are full of truth, warmth, and trust, can our other institutions perform their tasks, and when too many homes are defective, then the deterioration becomes contagiously interinstitutional, affecting schools and governments. If we are really concerned about the most economical way of achieving happiness for ourselves and/or our fellowmen and about those skills that are needed in successful human enterprises, then we should seek these gains through the family, with the help, of course, of other institutions. Otherwise, we shall always be investing dollars and hopes in less efficient ways of helping mankind. Just as the wheel does not have to be reinvented perpetually, we do not have to reinvent the family, a divine institution.
Author: Neal A. Maxwell, Source: "Family Perspectives", BYU Devotional, January 15, 1974Saved by ritchieheber in family home NealMaxwell inefficiency 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]
We assert to a sick and undernourished world that a divine diet has been prescribed for the soul of man, and further, that the primary source of his succor should be the family.
Author: Neal A. Maxwell, Source: "Family Perspectives", BYU Devotional, January 15, 1974Saved by ritchieheber in world family nourish NealMaxwell 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]

« Previous 1 » Next

tag cloud

Visit the tag cloud to see a visual representation of all the tags saved in Quoty.

popular tags