quotes tagged with 'character', page 7

On the other hand, surely what a man does when he is taken off his guard is the best evidence for what sort of a man he is? Surely what pops out before the man has time to put on a disguise is the truth? If there are rats in a cellar you are most likely to see them if you go in very suddenly. But the suddenness does not create the rats: it only prevents them from hiding. In the same way the suddenness of the provocation does not make me an ill-tempered man it only shows me what an ill-tempered man I am. The rats are always there in the cellar, but if you go in shouting and noisily they will have taken cover before you switch on the light.

Author: C. S. Lewis, Source: Mere Christianity, Book 4, Chapter 29Saved by cboyack in virtue character trial patience test personality 11 years ago[save this] [permalink]

We can't fully overcome these habits and impacted tendencies by ourselves. Our own resolves, our own will, our own effort - all this is necessary but is not sufficent. We need the transforming power of the Savior, born of faith in him and his atoning sacrifice and of entering into a contract with him. In such a contract, made in ordinance work and in private prayer, we covenant, or promise, or witness to take upon ourselves his name and to keep his commandments. He, in turn, promises us to give us his spirit, which, if we are true to our promises, will renew and strengthen and transform us. In this way we combine our power with the power of the Almighty.


Before we renew our covenants in the sacrament, before we promise or resolve to overcome a bad habit and establish a new one, we should sit down first and count the cost.


If we realistically count the costs and then make a deep enough commitment, we, with the Lord's help, can overcome the gravity pull of habits and atmospheric resistance of our environment with all its luring temptations.

Author: Stephen R. Covey, Source: "Spiritual Roots of Human Relations", Deseret Book 1970 - 8th printing, p.93Saved by mlsscaress in character commitment savior atonement practices covenants cost motives transformation resolve combine reorientation 11 years ago[save this] [permalink]

How can we break bad habits and form healthy new ones? The Savior gives us insight into the process in the following magnificent parable.


"For which of you, intending to build a tower, sitteth not down first, and counteth the cost, whether he have sufficient to finish it?


"Lest haply, after he hath laid the foundation, and is not able to finish it, all that behold it begin to mock him,


"Saying, This man began to build, and was not able to finish."


(Luke 14: 28-30)


Most of us are great starters and poor finishers. We begin to "mock" at ourselves, to lose faith in our ability to keep the promises we make with ourselves.


We simply to do not sit down first and count the cost to see if we have sufficent to finish - sufficent desire, sufficient internal thrust. We try to lift off our launching pad without realistically calculating the "g's" (gravity pull) and the resistance of the atmosphere (our environment).

Author: Stephen R. Covey, Source: "Spiritual Roots of Human Relations", Deseret Book 1970 - 8th printing, p.92Saved by mlsscaress in character process environment habits values practices structure cost motives transformation tendancies imbedded finish luke142830 11 years ago[save this] [permalink]

Many are sorely tried and tempted before their baptism, thinking such temptations will cease once they have been baptized. From my observation, this is not the case. The temptations often increase, although they may change in character. The greater the growth, the more subtle the temptation. 

Author: Stephen R. Covey , Source: "Spiritual Roots of Human Relations", Deseret Book 1970 - 8th printing, p.19Saved by mlsscaress in character temptation growth capacity aware subtle 11 years ago[save this] [permalink]

Let the American youth never forget, that they possess a noble inheritance, bought by the toils, and sufferings and blood of their ancestors; and capable, if wisely improved, and faithfully guarded, of transmitting to their latest posterity all the substantial blessings of life, the peaceful enjoyment of liberty, property, religion, and independence…Republics are created by the virture, public spirit, and intelligence of the citizens.  They fall, when the wise are banished from the public councils, because they dare to be honest and the profligate are rewarded, because they flatter the people, in order to betray them.

Author: Joseph Story, Source: Commentaries on the Constitution (http://books.google.com/book...Saved by cboyack in politics constitution liberty government freedom character knowledge usa youth statesman heritage 11 years ago[save this] [permalink]

"We have raised the bar," says Elder Ballard. "But that doesn't raise it just for the youth. That raises it for the parents, who have the primary responsibility for teaching their children principles. That raises it for the leaders. That raises it for the teachers. We've all got to take a step up in a world that is unraveling as fast as this one is.

Author: Melvin J. Ballard, Source: http://www.lds.org/ldsorg/v/index.jsp?vgnextoid=2354fccf2b7db0...Saved by cboyack in religion life character children family teacher teacher mormonism youth parent raisethebar 12 years ago[save this] [permalink]
Self-mastery is a challenge for every individual. Only we can control our appetites and passions. Self-mastery cannot be bought by money or fame. It is the ultimate test of our character. It requires climbing out of the deep valleys of our lives and scaling our own Mount Everests.
Author: President James E. Faust, Source: http://www.lds.org/ldsorg/v/index.jsp?vgnextoid=2354fccf2b7db0...Saved by mlsscaress in character individual appetite passion effort selfmastery balance 12 years ago[save this] [permalink]
Bridle is the word that wise father Alma used in counseling his son Shiblon, and the promise he attached is the key to understanding: "Bridle ... your passions, that ye may be filled with love." (Alma 38:12.) Bridling increases strength, increases power, increases love. There are absolutely two ways you can control a horse. One is to kill it; one is to bridle it. Alma never said kill your passions. The implication is not that passions are evil, that we shouldn't have them. On the contrary, we bridle something we love, something whose power we respect.

A horse is stronger than a man, so the man bridles it, thus controlling its power and using that power for good. Passions are stronger than we are, so we bridle them, thus controlling their power...
Author: Paul Dunn, Source: http://lds.org/ldsorg/v/index.jsp?vgnextoid=2354fccf2b7db010Vg...Saved by cboyack in control character love passion bridle 12 years ago[save this] [permalink]
He did not say we should suppress or eliminate our passions but rather bridle them—harness, channel, and focus them. Why? Because disciplining our passions makes possible a richer, deeper love.
Author: Bruce C. Hafen, Source: http://lds.org/ldsorg/v/index.jsp?vgnextoid=2354fccf2b7db010Vg...Saved by cboyack in control character love passion bridle 12 years ago[save this] [permalink]
During a perilous period of war, an exchange of letters occurred between Moroni, the captain of the Nephite armies, and Pahoran, the chief judge and governor of the land. Moroni, whose army was suffering because of inadequate support from the government, wrote to Pahoran "by the way of condemnation" (Alma 60:2) and harshly accused him of thoughtlessness, slothfulness, and neglect. Pahoran might easily have resented Moroni and his message, but he chose not to take offense. Pahoran responded compassionately and described a rebellion against the government about which Moroni was not aware. And then he responded, "Behold, I say unto you, Moroni, that I do not joy in your great afflictions, yea, it grieves my soul. . . . And now, in your epistle you have censured me, but it mattereth not; I am not angry, but do rejoice in the greatness of your heart" (Alma 61:2, 9).

One of the greatest indicators of our own spiritual maturity is revealed in how we respond to the weaknesses, the inexperience, and the potentially offensive actions of others. A thing, an event, or an expression may be offensive, but you and I can choose not to be offended—and to say with Pahoran, "it mattereth not."
Author: David A. Bednar, Source: http://www.lds.org/conference/talk/display/0,5232,49-1-646-32,...Saved by cboyack in character offense 12 years ago[save this] [permalink]

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