quotes tagged with 'devotion'

It is not the critic who counts: not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles or where the doer of deeds could have done better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly, who errs and comes up short again and again, because there is no effort without error or shortcoming, but who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions, who spends himself for a worthy cause; who, at the best, knows, in the end, the triumph of high achievement, and who, at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who knew neither victory nor defeat.

Author: Theodore Roosevelt, Source: "Citizenship in a Republic," Speech at the Sorbonne, Paris, April 23, 1910Saved by ImaWriterIII in fight valiant loyalty blood victory defeat cause cold credit devotion critic triumph sweat timid deeds arena dust marred fallshort theodoreroosevelt 9 years ago[save this] [permalink]

"The constant exercise of our faith by lofty thinking, prayer, devotion, and acts of righteousness is just as essential to spiritual health as physical exercise is to the health of the body. Like all priceless things, faith, if lost, is hard to regain. Eternal vigilance is the price of our faith. In order to retain our faith we must keep ourselves in tune with our Heavenly Father by living in accordance with the principles and ordinances of the gospel." 

Author: O. Leslie Stone, Source: "The Constant Exercise of Our Faith", July 1973, Ensign pg 59Saved by ragogoni in faith righteousness prayer thinking devotion spiritual 9 years ago[save this] [permalink]

It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly. So that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat.

Author: Theodore Roosevelt (American 26th US President (1901-09), 1858-1919), Source: "Citizenship in a Republic," Speech at the Sorbonne, Paris, Ap...Saved by mlsscaress in enthusiasm effort error error devotion critic triumph strive shortcomings daring spectator player 10 years ago[save this] [permalink]

We can have His Spirit by keeping that covenant. First, we promise to take His name upon us. That means we must see ourselves as His. We will put Him first in our lives. We will want what He wants rather than what we want or what the world teaches us to want. As long as we love the things of the world first, there will be no peace in us. Holding an ideal for a family or a nation of comfort through material goods will, at last, divide them. The ideal of doing for each other what the Lord would have us do, which follows naturally from taking His name upon us, can take us to a spiritual level which is a touch of heaven on earth.

Author: President Henry B. Eyring, Source: http://lds.org/ldsorg/v/index.jsp?vgnextoid=f318118dd536c010Vg...Saved by mlsscaress in progress priorities will peace covenant materialism holyghost sacrament devotion divide unify accompanied 11 years ago[save this] [permalink]
Pure love seeketh not her own. Look at the cartoon of this couple in a bookstore. There is a powerful story told in this scene. You ought to memorize it. What do you see here? The "spouse improvement" section is sold out, but the self-improvement section has scarcely sold a book. What does that tell you about human nature? Does it remind you of any of the Savior's teachings dealing with "motes" and "beams" in eyes? You've heard of the cartoon "The Far Side," well, this cartoon could be labeled "The Selfish Side." Your success in marriage will largely depend on your ability to reverse this cartoon and focus on improving yourself, rather than trying to reshape your spouse. It will depend more on being the right one--even more than finding the right one. "Don't just pray to marry the one you love. Instead, pray to love the one you marry."
Author: Elder Lynn G. Robbins, Source: http://www.byui.edu/Presentations/Transcripts/Devotionals/2002...Saved by mlsscaress in success selfish love service marriage charity perspective devotion expectations romanticlove 11 years ago[save this] [permalink]
What my son and his wife are doing with their little children transcends anything they could do in the Church or out. No service could be more important to the Lord than the devotion they give to one another and to their little children. And so it is with all our other children. The ultimate end of all activity in the Church centers in the home and the family.
Author: President Boyd K. Packer , Source: The Weak and the Simple of the Church. Oct 2007 General Confer...Saved by mlsscaress in priorities gospel children family home devotion 12 years ago[save this] [permalink]
In this work there must be commitment. There must be devotion. We are engaged in a great eternal struggle that concerns the very souls of the sons and daughters of God. We are not losing. We are winning. We will continue to win if we will be faithful and true. We can do it. We must do it. We will do it. There is nothing the Lord has asked of us that in faith we cannot accomplish.
Author: Gordon B. Hinckley, Source: "An Unending Conflict, a Victory Assured," Ensign, June 2007, 8Saved by cboyack in faith duty responsibility commitment accomplishment devotion 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]
For the serious disciple, the cardinal attributes exemplified by Jesus are not optional. These developmental milestones take the form of traits, traits that mark the trail to be traveled. After all, should not Latter-day Saints have a special interest in what is required to become a Saint, virtue by virtue and quality by quality? Hear the words of King Benjamin:

And becometh a saint . . . submissive, meek, humble, patient, full of love, willing to submit to all things which the Lord seeth fit to inflict upon him. [Mosiah 3:19]

These attributes are eternal and portable! Being portable, to the degree developed, they will go with us through the veil of death, and still later they will rise with us in the Resurrection when all else stays behind. Meanwhile, so much of our time is ironically devoted to learning and marketing perishable skills that will soon become obsolete. It isn't just the morticians who will have a vocational crisis in the next world, brother and sisters.
Author: Elder Neal A Maxwell, Source: "In Him All Things Hold Together", http://speeches.byu.edu/rea...Saved by mlsscaress in resurrection love disciple attributes time devotion saint skills traits humble meek submissive patient develop vocation 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]
Many things, in fact most, are interesting, and many are enticing. But some things are important. The limits of time dictate that we must prioritize what we do. The divinely given and heaven-protected gift of agency allows us to determine to what degree we will serve others and allow them to serve us. The depth of involvement in that which is important, rather than just interesting, is our own choice.

As we make these choices, we might consider that the glitter and excitement of festive, fun-filled projects are interesting, but the shut-ins, the lonely, the handicapped, the homeless, the latchkey kids, and the abandoned aged are important.

Worldly magazines, tabloids, and much of the multi-mass media mess of fast-track information we are receiving is interesting and enticing, but the scriptures are important.

The RVs and the TVs and retirement ease make it interesting to wander and play, but people’s needs for selfless deeds are important. There is concern that “wander and play” have replaced “ponder and pray.”

A focus on fashion and getting and spending and the accumulation of things for our enjoyment and comfort is interesting and enticing, but a focus on devoting one’s means and time and one’s very self to the cause of proclaiming the gospel is important.

The meetings and materials and planning are all interesting, but the doing is important.

With the constant exhortation to come unto Christ is the promise that we can be perfected in him. If we do all that we can do by loving and serving God with all of our might, mind, and strength, then is his grace sufficient for us. By his grace, after all that we can do, we may become perfect in Christ. Shall we not then strive for the recognition of that Almighty God who is our Father, through our selfless service?

“And when he had called the people unto him with his disciples also, he said unto them, Whosoever will come after me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow me.

“For whosoever will save his life shall lose it; but whosoever shall lose his life for my sake and the gospel’s, the same shall save it.

“For what shall it profit a man, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul?

“Or what shall a man give in exchange for his soul?” (Mark 8:34–37).
Author: Elder William R. Bradford, Source: “Selfless Service,” Ensign, Nov 1987, 75: http://www.lds.org/...Saved by mlsscaress in agency priorities media soul service materialism grace entertainment choices devotion glitter stimilus 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]
The state of mind which enables a man to do work of this kind is akin to that of the religious worshiper or the lover; the daily effort comes from no deliberate intention or program, but straight from the heart.
Author: Albert Einstein, Source: unknownSaved by Doc in work labor heart devotion 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]

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