quotes tagged with 'entertainment'

The moral is that there is no such thing as "mere" entertainment. The human mind is an attachment machine, forming emotional bonds with stuffed animals, invertebrates and Izzie Stevens. A good drama might ease our loneliness, but a breakup is still a breakup.

Author: Jonah Lehrer, Source: http://scienceblogs.com/cortex/2009/07/television_and_loneline...Saved by Doc in humanity television entertainment emotion attachment connections 10 years ago[save this] [permalink]
What does it mean to speak of child protection when pornography and violence can be viewed in so many homes through media widely available today? Children deserve to grow up with a healthy understanding of sexuality and its proper place in human relationships. They should be spared the degrading manifestations and the crude manipulation of sexuality so prevalent today…All have a part to play in this task—not only parents, religious leaders, teachers and catechists, but the media and entertainment industries as well.
Author: Pope Benedict XVI, Source: http://northtemple.com/1506Saved by richardkmiller in media parenting pornography entertainment sexuality 12 years ago[save this] [permalink]
Our education must never stop. If it ends at the door of the classroom on graduation day, we will fail. And since what we will need to know is hard to discern, we need the help of heaven to know which of the myriad of things we could study we would most wisely learn. It also means that we cannot waste time entertaining ourselves when we have the chance to read or to listen to whatever will help us learn what is true and useful. Insatiable curiosity will be our hallmark.
Author: Elder Henry B. Eyring, Source: CES Fireside for Young Adults, 6 May 2001, http://lds.org/broa...Saved by mlsscaress in truth information heaven education time discern entertainment curiosity 12 years ago[save this] [permalink]
I want it distinctly understood, that fiddling and dancing are no part of our worship. The question may be asked, What are they for, then? I answer, that my body may keep pace with my mind. My mind labors like a man logging, all the time; and this is the reason why I am fond of these pastimes—they give me a privilege to throw everything off, and shake myself, that my body may exercise, and my mind rest. What for? To get strength, and be renewed and quickened, and enlivened, and animated, so that my mind may not wear out.
Author: Brigham Young, Source: Discourses of Brigham Young, p. 242Saved by cboyack in strength mind worship entertainment rest 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]
Many things, in fact most, are interesting, and many are enticing. But some things are important. The limits of time dictate that we must prioritize what we do. The divinely given and heaven-protected gift of agency allows us to determine to what degree we will serve others and allow them to serve us. The depth of involvement in that which is important, rather than just interesting, is our own choice.

As we make these choices, we might consider that the glitter and excitement of festive, fun-filled projects are interesting, but the shut-ins, the lonely, the handicapped, the homeless, the latchkey kids, and the abandoned aged are important.

Worldly magazines, tabloids, and much of the multi-mass media mess of fast-track information we are receiving is interesting and enticing, but the scriptures are important.

The RVs and the TVs and retirement ease make it interesting to wander and play, but people’s needs for selfless deeds are important. There is concern that “wander and play” have replaced “ponder and pray.”

A focus on fashion and getting and spending and the accumulation of things for our enjoyment and comfort is interesting and enticing, but a focus on devoting one’s means and time and one’s very self to the cause of proclaiming the gospel is important.

The meetings and materials and planning are all interesting, but the doing is important.

With the constant exhortation to come unto Christ is the promise that we can be perfected in him. If we do all that we can do by loving and serving God with all of our might, mind, and strength, then is his grace sufficient for us. By his grace, after all that we can do, we may become perfect in Christ. Shall we not then strive for the recognition of that Almighty God who is our Father, through our selfless service?

“And when he had called the people unto him with his disciples also, he said unto them, Whosoever will come after me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow me.

“For whosoever will save his life shall lose it; but whosoever shall lose his life for my sake and the gospel’s, the same shall save it.

“For what shall it profit a man, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul?

“Or what shall a man give in exchange for his soul?” (Mark 8:34–37).
Author: Elder William R. Bradford, Source: “Selfless Service,” Ensign, Nov 1987, 75: http://www.lds.org/...Saved by mlsscaress in agency priorities media soul service materialism grace entertainment choices devotion glitter stimilus 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]
By "drawing the line" I do not mean to exclude ourselves from that society. I do suggest that we must confirm and coalesce our opposition to the surge of degeneracy that now permeates our entertainments, our literature, and our so-called arts. We can no longer casually endure (if not ultimately embrace) the continued downward spiral of our culture's art, literature, and entertainment into the abyss of vile perversion. As Joshua challenged Israel, so we must accept the challenge to "choose you this day whom ye will serve." As Christ taught so directly, "Ye cannot serve God and mammon." Latter-day Saints can no longer accept the false notion that it is possible to honor the covenants we have made, to be loyal to the Godhead who have revealed themselves to us, and at the same time participate, even in the role of a passive observer, in the practices all about us that are leading to greater and greater degeneracy.
Author: John Harmer, Source: A War We Must WinSaved by richardkmiller in art literature entertainment covenants lds degeneracy choose serve 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]
The daily spectacle of atrocious acts has stifled all feeling of pity in the hearts of men. When every hour we see or hear of an act of dreadful cruelty we lose all feeling of humanity. Crime no longer horrifies us. We smile at the enormities of our youth. We condone passion, when we should understand that the unrestrained emotions of men produce chaos. Once we were a nation of self-control and austerity, and had a reverence for life and justice. This is no longer true. We prefer our politicians, particularly if they swagger with youth and are accomplished jesters and liars. We love entertainment, even in law, even in government. Unless we reform our fate is terrible.
Author: Taylor Caldwell, Source: A Pillar of IronSaved by richardkmiller in government law entertainment drama desensitization politicians 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]
Recreation is important, but in many cases we have allowed it to literally root out of our daily lives the study of the gospel and the scriptures. No doubt our challenge is not so much a lack of time as it is the perpetual rat race which smothers us under a virtual tidal wave of tantalizing trivia.
Author: W. Cleon Skousen, Source: Do You Really Want the Rest of the Book of Mormon?Saved by cboyack in priorities media recreation entertainment 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]

« Previous 1 » Next

tag cloud

Visit the tag cloud to see a visual representation of all the tags saved in Quoty.

popular tags