quotes tagged with 'flow'

You write until you come to a place where you still have your juice and know what will happen next and you stop and try to live through until the next day when you hit it again.
Author: Earnest Hemingway, Source: http://shawnblanc.net/2008/interview-john-gruber/Saved by richardkmiller in creativity writing flow 12 years ago[save this] [permalink]
There isn’t a single great work in the history of civilization, no novel, symphony, film, or song that was completed as a 1/5th time-slice between e-mail, IM, cellphones and television. Despite the modern drive to consume things made by others, time will always be our most finite resource and it crumbles when split into tiny little pieces. And it’s up to us to choose how much of life is spent passively (consuming, waiting, watching) vs. actively (thinking, debating, feeling, doing, making). Whatever we choose, when we die, we have no one to blame but ourselves for where our time, and attention, went.
Author: Scott Berkun, Source: http://www.scottberkun.com/essays/51-attention-and-sex/Saved by richardkmiller in work attention focus concentration time flow masterpiece 12 years ago[save this] [permalink]
It’s knowing what to ignore that makes us successful, not how many volumes of data we can consume at the same time. Ask any successful athlete, performer, or writer about how they consistently perform at high levels and they’ll tell you about focus, and the discipline of centering their attention on what they’re doing. They practice and drill so that basic tasks become so familiar that they don’t have to think about them anymore, focusing instead on the details most of us miss.
Author: Scott Berkun, Source: http://www.scottberkun.com/essays/51-attention-and-sex/Saved by richardkmiller in excellence attention focus flow ignore 12 years ago[save this] [permalink]
We are often happiest when we are WORKING, despite the demands of contemporary work. It is when we most commonly experience "flow," that sense of doing what we do well, when we can lose ourselves in the moment. Many of us work at home at least part of the time now, and we can make the experience more rewarding. We can enjoy it, whether we are working for ourselves or others, because there are ways to optimize flow. And that means creating an environment that functions well and feels good. Drop the office aesthetic; it subliminally reinforces the message that work is a duty. And, given that so much of what we do is technological in texture, it is important to bring some warmth, some life, some sensuous pleasure. Have your office in the toolshed or in bed sometimes. Make it pleasurable. Establish personal rituals. Allegedly Edith Sitwell sat in a coffin before she started work, whereas Katherine Mansfield gardened, and Colette picked the fleas off her cat. Anything to stave off the moment. In practice, work boils down to right-brain creative work and left-brain logical work. You can't speed up right-brain work. It is highly intuitive and hard to schedule. We do it best when we let ideas happen in their own time. Left-brain work depends on efficiency, processes, and very good tools. It is fast, rational, analytical, linear. Each type needs its own environment.
Author: Ilse Crawford, Source: Home Is Where The Heart Is. p. 133. Rizzoli Intl Publications Inc. New York, New York.Saved by mlsscaress in creative environment home rational flow rewarding warmth working function form aesthetic ritual 12 years ago[save this] [permalink]
When we inspire and teach others to fill their hearts with love, obedience flows from the inside out in voluntary acts of self-sacrifice and service. Yes, those who go home teaching out of duty, for example, may fulfill their obligation. But those who home teach out of genuine love for the Lord and for their fellowman will likely approach that task with a very different attitude.
Author: Elder Joseph B. Wirthlin, Source: “The Great Commandment,” Ensign, Nov 2007, 28–31; http://www.l...Saved by mlsscaress in obedience attitude love teach hometeaching flow genuine acts visitingteaching voluntary selfsacrifice obligation approach 12 years ago[save this] [permalink]
In our day, as in times past, many people expect that if there be revelation it will come with awe-inspiring, earth-shaking display. For many it is hard to accept as revelation those numerous ones in Moses’ time, in Joseph’s time, and in our own year—those revelations which come to prophets as deep, unassailable impressions settling down on the prophet’s mind and heart as dew from heaven or as the dawn dissipates the darkness of night.

Expecting the spectacular, one may not be fully alerted to the constant flow of revealed communication....

Revelation does not always mean “walking with God,” nor “face-to-face,” nor “lips-to-ear.” There are many kinds of revelation—some more and some less spectacular.
Author: Spencer W. Kimball, Source: Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Spencer W. Kimball: htt...Saved by mlsscaress in revelation heart impression flow dew spectacular alert 12 years ago[save this] [permalink]
Don't let someone else define your creative process. No matter how much the gurus know about the creative process and productivity, they aren't you -- because you are unique. Your muse and creative flow may be found in a completely different place.
Author: Jay - , Source: How to Work like the Masters: http://liferemix.net/how-work-ma...Saved by mlsscaress in self creative flow unique 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]
The older people think more slowly, but they have a faster fluid intelligence, so they are better able to block out interruptions and choose what to focus on.
Author: Martin Westwell, Source: http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/25/business/25multi.html?ex=133...Saved by richardkmiller in focus concentration intelligence flow 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]
I’m lucky enough to be able to block out a lot of distractions and interruptions, and to spend an unusually large fraction of my working life in a state of flow. To the extent that I’m able to get a decent amount of quality work done, I tend to cite long periods of focused concentration as the reason why.
Author: Jon Udell, Source: http://blog.jonudell.net/2007/04/25/multitasking-tradeoffs-ind...Saved by richardkmiller in creation work creativity focus concentration flow 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]
Flow requires a depth of thinking and a focus of attention that all that context-switching prevents. Flow requires a challenging use of our knowledge and skills, and that's quite different from mindless tasks we can multitask (eating and watching tv, etc.) Flow means we need a certain amount of time to load our knowledge and skills into our brain RAM. And the more big or small interruptions we have, the less likely we are to ever get there.

And not only are we stopping ourselves from ever getting in flow, we're stopping ourselves from ever getting really good at something. From becoming experts. The brain scientists now tell us that becoming an expert is not a matter of being a prodigy, it's a matter of being able to focus.
Author: Kathy Sierra, Source: http://headrush.typepad.com/creating_passionate_users/2007/03/...Saved by richardkmiller in work mind genius focus concentration flow expert 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]

« Previous 1 » Next

tag cloud

Visit the tag cloud to see a visual representation of all the tags saved in Quoty.

popular tags