quotes tagged with 'gtd'

 


We become masters of our lives in the same way—by focusing on first things first. We all have a pretty good idea of the most important decisions we need to make—decisions that will improve our lives and bring us greater happiness and peace. That is where we should start. That is where we should place our greatest effort.


Each night before I go to bed, I take out a small card and write a list of the things I need to do the next day in order of their priority.


When I arrive at the office in the morning, I check my card and put all my efforts into the first item on the list. When I accomplish that item, I move on to the second and so on. Some days, I finish every item on my list. On other days, some tasks are not completed. I don't become discouraged, however, because I'm focusing my energies on the things that matter most.


 

Author: Joseph B. Wirthlin, Source: http://lds.org/conference/talk/display/0,5232,23-1-401-24,00.h...Saved by richardkmiller in priorities energy effort focus gtd mastery 11 years ago[save this] [permalink]
When we invite the Holy Ghost to fill our minds with light and knowledge, He “quickens” us, that is to say, enlightens and enlivens the inner man or woman. As a result we notice a measurable difference in our soul. We feel strengthened, filled with peace and joy. We possess spiritual energy and enthusiasm, both of which enhance our natural abilities. We can accomplish more than we otherwise could do on our own. We yearn to become a holier person.
Author: Keith K. Hilbig, Source: http://www.lds.org/ldsorg/v/index.jsp?vgnextoid=2354fccf2b7db0...Saved by richardkmiller in energy peace light knowledge joy holyghost gtd holiness 12 years ago[save this] [permalink]
Focus on great for a few things and good enough for the rest. Perfection is a good ideal and direction to have, but recognize it for what it is: an impossible destination.
Author: Timothy Ferriss, Source: The Four Hour WorkweekSaved by richardkmiller in focus perfection good gtd great 12 years ago[save this] [permalink]
Slowing down doesn't mean accomplishing less; it means cutting out counterproductive distractions and the perception of being rushed.
Author: Timothy Ferriss, Source: The Four Hour WorkweekSaved by richardkmiller in productivity focus gtd less slow 12 years ago[save this] [permalink]
If you can't define it or act upon it, forget it.
Author: Timothy Ferriss, Source: The Four Hour WorkweekSaved by richardkmiller in focus gtd questions 12 years ago[save this] [permalink]
The Master does nothing,
yet he leaves nothing undone.
The ordinary man is always doing things,
yet many more are left to be done.
Author: Tao Te Ching, Source: http://www.fourhourworkweek.com/blog/2007/05/09/outsourcing-li...Saved by richardkmiller in leadership delegation productivity gtd 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]
We become masters of our lives in the same way—by focusing on first things first. We all have a pretty good idea of the most important decisions we need to make—decisions that will improve our lives and bring us greater happiness and peace. That is where we should start. That is where we should place our greatest effort.

Each night before I go to bed, I take out a small card and write a list of the things I need to do the next day in order of their priority.

When I arrive at the office in the morning, I check my card and put all my efforts into the first item on the list. When I accomplish that item, I move on to the second and so on. Some days, I finish every item on my list. On other days, some tasks are not completed. I don't become discouraged, however, because I'm focusing my energies on the things that matter most.
Author: Joseph B. Wirthlin, Source: http://www.lds.org/conference/talk/display/0,5232,23-1-401-24,...Saved by richardkmiller in focus concentration decision gtd priority 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]
So shrink your time. Keep breaking down timeframes into smaller chunks. Instead of a 12 week project, think of it as 12 weeklong projects. Instead of guesstimating at tasks that take 30 hours, break them down into more realistic 6-10 hour chunks. Then proceed one step at a time.

The same theory applies to other problems too. Are you facing an issue that's too big to wrap your mind around? Break it down. Keep dividing problems into smaller and smaller pieces until you're able to digest them.
Author: 37 Signals, Source: http://gettingreal.37signals.com/ch06_Shrink_Your_Time.phpSaved by richardkmiller in solution management time gtd 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]
1. Decide if it's worth doing, and if so:
2. Do it quick — not perfect. just do it.
3. Save it. upload it. publish it
4. See what people think
Author: Derek Sivers, Source: http://gettingreal.37signals.com/ch06_Test_in_the_Wild.phpSaved by richardkmiller in work gtd 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]
So, what used to be “Sure, I’ll do your web site” is now more often “Sure, I’ll give you 10 hours and 3 calls over the next month to use however you want.” If nothing else, it helps everyone understand that time is a precious commodity, but it also gets me out of being the de facto manager for every aspect of a project I touch. So far, it seems to be working swell.
Author: Merlin Mann, Source: http://www.43folders.com/2004/12/29/a-year-of-getting-things-d...Saved by richardkmiller in management time giving gtd expectations volunteering 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]

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