quotes tagged with 'joy'

Many people lose the small joys in the hope for the big happiness

Author: Pearl S Buck, Source: unknownSaved by l1nds4y in happiness loss hope joy 1 month ago[save this] [permalink]

We live in a world where joy and empathy and pleasure are all around us, there for the noticing

Author: Ira Glass, Source: unknownSaved by l1nds4y in life world joy empathy observation 1 month ago[save this] [permalink]

Do not ask your children to strive for extraordinary lives.
Such striving may seem admirable, but it is the way of foolishness.
Help them instead to find the wonder and the marvel of an ordinary life.
Show them the joy of tasting tomatoes, apples and pears.
Show them how to cry when pets and people die.
Show them the infinite pleasure in the touch of a hand.
And make the ordinary come alive for them. The extraordinary will take care of itself.

Author: William Martin, Source: The Parent's Tao Te Ching: Ancient Advice for Modern ParentsSaved by jarvie in happiness pleasure children joy simplicity ordinary extraordinary mourning 6 years ago[save this] [permalink]

"Like the shepherds of old, we need to say in our hearts, “Let us see this thing which is come to pass.” We need to desire it in our hearts. Let us see the Holy One of Israel in the manger, in the temple, on the mount, and on the cross. Like the shepherds, let us glorify and praise God for these tidings of great joy!"

Author: Dieter F. Uchtdorf, Source: "Can We See the Christ?", Liahona, Dec. 2010, 4–6Saved by ragogoni in heart desire joy shepherds 8 years ago[save this] [permalink]

The effect of a smile is powerful, even when it is unseen.

Author: Dale Carnegie, Source: How to Win Friends and Influence People, p. 68Saved by amberb in smile kindness joy 8 years ago[save this] [permalink]

The expression one wears on one's face is far more important than the clothes on wears on one's back.

Author: Dale Carnegie, Source: How to Win Friends and Influence People, p. 66Saved by amberb in smile kindness joy 8 years ago[save this] [permalink]

When you focus on what you don’t have or on situations that displease you, your mind also becomes darkened.  You take for granted life, salvation, sunshine, flowers, and countless other gifts from Me.  You look for what is wrong and refuse to enjoy life until that is “fixed.”

Author: Jesus Calling , Source: Jesus CallingSaved by wordlovergirl in focus joy jesus 8 years ago[save this] [permalink]

In the past year I have met thousands of Latter-day Saint women in many countries. The list of challenges these sisters face is lengthy and sobering. There are family troubles, economic tests, calamities, accidents, and illnesses. There is much distraction and not enough peace and joy. Despite popular media messages to the contrary, no one is rich enough, beautiful enough, or clever enough to avoid a mortal experience.

Author: Julie B. Beck Relief Society General President, Source: http://lds.org/conference/talk/display/0,5232,23-1-1207-3,00.h...Saved by mlsscaress in peace mortality joy troubles challenges distraction calamities 8 years ago[save this] [permalink]

Good women always have a desire to know if they are succeeding. In a world where the measures of success are often distorted, it is important to seek appreciation and affirmation from proper sources. To paraphrase a list found in Preach My Gospel, we are doing well when we develop attributes of Christ and strive to obey His gospel with exactness. We are doing well when we seek to improve ourselves and do our best. We are doing well when we increase faith and personal righteousness, strengthen families and homes, and seek out and help others who are in need. We know we are successful if we live so that we qualify for, receive, and know how to follow the Spirit. When we have done our very best, we may still experience disappointments, but we will not be disappointed in ourselves. We can feel certain that the Lord is pleased when we feel the Spirit working through us. Peace, joy, and hope are available to those who measure success properly.

Author: Julie B. Beck Relief Society General President, Source: http://lds.org/conference/talk/display/0,5232,23-1-1207-3,00.h...Saved by mlsscaress in success obedience faith peace measure hope service joy righteousness proper improve affirmation 8 years ago[save this] [permalink]

For a moment, think back about your favorite fairy tale. In that story the main character may be a princess or a peasant; she might be a mermaid or a milkmaid, a ruler or a servant. You will find one thing all have in common: they must overcome adversity.


Cinderella has to endure her wicked stepmother and evil stepsisters. She is compelled to suffer long hours of servitude and ridicule.


In “Beauty and the Beast,” Belle becomes a captive to a frightful-looking beast in order to save her father. She sacrifices her home and family, all she holds dear, to spend several months in the beast’s castle.


In the tale “Rumpelstiltskin,” a poor miller promises the king that his daughter can spin straw into gold. The king immediately sends for her and locks her in a room with a mound of straw and a spinning wheel. Later in the story she faces the danger of losing her firstborn child unless she can guess the name of the magical creature who helped her in this impossible task.


In each of these stories, Cinderella, Belle, and the miller’s daughter have to experience sadness and trial before they can reach their “happily ever after.” Think about it. Has there ever been a person who did not have to go through his or her own dark valley of temptation, trial, and sorrow?


Sandwiched between their “once upon a time” and “happily ever after,” they all had to experience great adversity. Why must all experience sadness and tragedy? Why could we not simply live in bliss and peace, each day filled with wonder, joy, and love?


The scriptures tell us there must be opposition in all things, for without it we could not discern the sweet from the bitter. Would the marathon runner feel the triumph of finishing the race had she not felt the pain of the hours of pushing against her limits? Would the pianist feel the joy of mastering an intricate sonata without the painstaking hours of practice?


In stories, as in life, adversity teaches us things we cannot learn otherwise. Adversity helps to develop a depth of character that comes in no other way. Our loving Heavenly Father has set us in a world filled with challenges and trials so that we, through opposition, can learn wisdom, become stronger, and experience joy.

Author: President Dieter F. Uchtdorf , Source: http://www.lds.org/conference/talk/display/0,5232,23-1-1207-40...Saved by mlsscaress in character trial experience wisdom adversity joy strong challenges tragedy triumph fairytale depth 8 years ago[save this] [permalink]

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