quotes tagged with 'language'

It turns out that there is also a big difference in how number-naming systems in Western and Asian languages are constructed. In English, we say fourteen, sixteen, seventeen, eighteen, and nineteen, so one might expect that we would also say oneteen, twoteen, threeteen, and fiveteen. But we don't. We use a different form: eleven, twelve, thirteen, and fifteen. Similarly, we have forty and sixty, which sound like the words they are related to (four and six). But we also say fifty and thirty and twnty, which sort of sound live five an three and two, but not really. And, for that matter, for numbers above twenty, we put the "decade" first and the unit number second (twenty-one, twenty-two), whereas for the teens, we do it the other way around (fourteen, seventeen, eighteen). The number system in English is highly irregular. Not so in China, Japan and Korea. They have a logical counting system, Eleven is ten-one. Twelve is ten-two. Twenty-four is two-tens-four and so on.


That difference means that Asian children learn to count much faster than American children. Four-year old Chinese children can count, on average, to forty. American children at that age can count only to fifteen, and most don't reach forty until they're five...


"The Asian system is transparent," says Karen Fuson, a Northwestern University psychologist who has closely studied Asian-Western differences. "I think that it makes the whole attitude toward math different. Instead of being a rote learning thing, there's a pattern I can figure out. There is an expectation that it's sensible. For fractions, we say thee-fifths. The Chinese literally "out of five parts, take three.' That's telling you conceptually what a fraction is. It's differentiating the denominator and the numberator."


...When it comes to math, in other words, Asians have a built-in advantage. But it's an unusual kind of advantage. For years, students from China, South Korea, and Japan - and the children of recent immigrants who are from those countries - have substantially outpreformed their Western counterparts at mathematics, and the typical assumption is tha tit has something to do with a kind of innate Asian proclivity for math. The psychologist Richard Lynn has even gone so far as to propose an elaborate evolutionary theory involving the Himalayas, really cold weather, premodern hunting practices, brain size, and specialized vowel sounds to explain why Asians have higher IQs. That's how we think about math. We assume that being good at things like calculus and algebra is a simple function of how smart someone is. But the differences between the number systems in the East and the West suggest something very different - that being good at math may also be rooted in a group's culture.

Author: Malcom Gladwell, Source: Outliers, p. 228-231Saved by mlsscaress in america learning environment culture language capacity math advantage proclivity iq 11 years ago[save this] [permalink]

Music is the universal language of mankind.  

Author: Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Outre-Mer, Source: http://www.quotegarden.com/music.htmlSaved by dyejo in music language 11 years ago[save this] [permalink]

It is impossible to prefigure the salvation of the world in the same language by which teh world has been dismembered and defaced.

Author: Wendell Berry, Source: Life is a Miracle: An Essay Against Modern Superstition, page 8Saved by ldsphilosopher in salvation language naturalism mechanism 12 years ago[save this] [permalink]
I find the patterns and distinctions we have discussed this morning to be an additional confirmation that Joseph Smith could not have written the Book of Mormon. He did not have the capability to express such concepts with his rudimentary education and the amount of time he had to work on the translation, which was perhaps 80 days. Opponents and critics of the Church have claimed, "He had the plates for much longer than 80 days." To which I have told them: "I do not care. He could have worked on such a book for 50 years. If you want to argue about the time period, fine. Give him 100 years. Give him 200 years. Give him a staff of 80 of the best editors and assistants on the earth. But it would not make any difference. He could not have used language that eloquent, that precise, and which highlighted such important spiritual distinctions. It just could not be done."
Author: Elder David A. Bednar, Source: http://www.byui.edu/Presentations/transcripts/religionsymposiu...Saved by mlsscaress in bookofmormon language translation joseph smith inspired eloquent precise distinct 12 years ago[save this] [permalink]
With the growth of the Church, we likely could never build a hall large enough to accommodate all who would wish to assemble in one place. Nor would accelerating travel costs make possible their coming. The gifts of science have provided a more convenient way. We are confident that as the work of the Lord expands, he will inspire men to develop the means whereby the membership of the Church, wherever they may be, can be counseled in an intimate and personal way by his chosen prophet. Communication is the sinew that binds the Church as one great family. Between those facilities which are now available and those which are on the horizon, we shall be able to converse one with another according to the needs and circumstances of the time.
Author: Gordon B. Hinckley, Source: http://www.lds.org/ldsorg/v/index.jsp?vgnextoid=2354fccf2b7db0...Saved by mlsscaress in church circumstances communication internet moregood science prophet technology growth language mormonism needs sinew 12 years ago[save this] [permalink]
When one of our daughters was about three years old, she did something that always delighted her parents. When we called her name, she would usually answer by saying, “Here me is.” This childish reply was among the sweetest things her parents heard. But when she was grown, we expected her to use appropriate language when she spoke, and of course she did. As the Apostle Paul said, “When I was a child, I spake as a child, I understood as a child, I thought as a child: but when I became a man, I put away childish things.” (1 Cor. 13:11.)

The same is true of prayer. Our earliest efforts will be heard with joy by our Heavenly Father, however they are phrased. They will be heard in the same way by loving members of our church. But as we gain experience as members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, we need to become more mature in all of our efforts, including our prayers.

Men and women who wish to show respect will take the time to learn the special language of prayer. Persons spend many hours mastering communication skills in other mediums, such as poetry or prose, vocal or instrumental music, and even the language of access to computers. My brothers and sisters, the manner of addressing our Heavenly Father in prayer is at least as important as these.
Author: Elder Dallin H. Oaks, Source: http://www.lds.org/ldsorg/v/index.jsp?vgnextoid=2354fccf2b7db0...Saved by mlsscaress in communication importance effort prayer prayer language maturity refine 12 years ago[save this] [permalink]
I am sure that our Heavenly Father, who loves all of his children, hears and answers all prayers, however phrased. If he is offended in connection with prayers, it is likely to be by their absence, not their phraseology.
Author: Elder Dallin H. Oaks, Source: http://www.lds.org/ldsorg/v/index.jsp?vgnextoid=2354fccf2b7db0...Saved by mlsscaress in words prayer language answers communicate connection 12 years ago[save this] [permalink]
Do you want guidance? Have you prayed to the Lord for inspiration? Do you want to do right or do you want to do what you want to do whether or not it is right? Do you want to do what is best for you in the long run or what seems more desirable for the moment? Have you prayed? How much have you prayed? How did you pray? Have you prayed as did the Savior of the world in Gethsemane or did you ask for what you want regardless of its being proper? Do you say in your prayers: “Thy will be done”? Did you say, “Heavenly Father, if you will inspire and impress me with the right, I will do that right”? Or, did you pray, “Give me what I want or I will take it anyway”? Did you say: “Father in Heaven, I love you, I believe in you, I know you are omniscient. I am honest. I am sincerely desirous of doing right. I know you can see the end from the beginning. You can see the future. You can discern if under this situation I present, I will have peace or turmoil, happiness or sorrow, success or failure. Tell me, please, loved Heavenly Father, and I promise to do what you tell me to do.” Have you prayed that way? Don’t you think it might be wise? Are you courageous enough to pray that prayer?
Author: Spencer W. Kimball, Source: Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Spencer W. Kimball: htt...Saved by mlsscaress in inspiration direction prayer guidance language seek longrun moment proper 12 years ago[save this] [permalink]
Sometimes we don’t recognize [revelations] when they come. We pray and pray and pray for wisdom and judgment and then we feel somewhat like we ought to go this particular direction. There was revelation there. The Lord answers these questions that you propose.

What will be the language the Lord will use? Through the Prophet Joseph Smith, the Lord counseled Oliver Cowdery, who wondered about an answer to his prayers:

“Verily, verily, I say unto you, if you desire a further witness, cast your mind upon the night that you cried unto me in your heart, that you might know concerning the truth of these things.

“Did I not speak peace to your mind concerning the matter? What greater witness can you have than from God?” (D&C 6:22–23.)
Author: Spencer W. Kimball, Source: Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Spencer W. Kimball: htt...Saved by mlsscaress in revelation wisdom peace pray language answers judgement witness recognize 12 years ago[save this] [permalink]
In the lapse of two or three centuries, changes have taken place which, in particular passages, ... obscure the sense of the original languages.... The effect of these changes is that some words are not understood ... and being now used in a sense different from that which they had ... present wrong signification of the false ideas. Whenever words are understood in a sense different from that which they had when introduced... mistakes may be very injurious.
Author: Noah Webster, Source: The Holy Bible, Containing the Old and New Testaments, in the Common Version. With Amendments of the Language. New Haven: Durrie and Peck, 1833. Reprinted Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, 1987.Saved by cboyack in bible meaning language clarity word interpretation revisionism obscurity definition dictionary 12 years ago[save this] [permalink]

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