quotes tagged with 'learning'

Education is what remains after one has forgotten what one has learned in school.

Author: Albert Einstein, Source: http://www.wisdomquotes.com/quote/albert-einstein-71.htmlSaved by prabatuty in education learning school 4 years ago[save this] [permalink]

It is essential, my son…that you should form and adopt certain rules or principles…It is in the Bible, you must learn them, and from the Bible how to practice them.

Author: John Quincy Adams, Source: UnknownSaved by ImaWriterIII in education johnquincyadams principle bible learning father 9 years ago[save this] [permalink]

Learn as much by writing as by reading.

Author: Lord Acton, Source: UnknownSaved by ImaWriterIII in education reading learning writing lordacton 9 years ago[save this] [permalink]

Learning is not attained by chance, it must be sought for with order and attended to with diligence.

Author: Abigail Adams, Source: UnknownSaved by ImaWriterIII in education learning diligent chance abigailadams 9 years ago[save this] [permalink]

The rules of strategy are few and simple. They may be learned in a week. They may be taught by familiar illustrations or a dozen diagrams. But such knowledge will no more teach a man to lead an army like Napoleon than a knowledge of grammar will teach him to write like Gibbon.

Author: Colonel Henderson, Source: UnknownSaved by ImaWriterIII in war learning strategy tactics EDS colhenderson 9 years ago[save this] [permalink]

Do not read, as children do, to amuse yourself, or like the ambitious, for the purpose of instruction. No, read in order to live.

Author: Gustave Flaubert, Source: UnknownSaved by ImaWriterIII in education children reading learning books live gustaveflaubert 9 years ago[save this] [permalink]

One of the most powerful sources of personal development will come through the urgent prayers you offer in faith for a foundation of righteousness. You will learn much as feelings distill in your mind and heart. Avoid prayers that appear to be a set of instructions to the Lord--do this, bless that, change this, help me with that. Rather, be a compliant student to the Ultimate Teacher. He wants you to succeed even more than you do yourself.


This is a time to set your course for life, a time to establish fundamental priorities. One of the challenges of your learning experience here is to be able to differentiate among the smorgasbord of good and bad things that can be done and to select those that are righteous and truly essential.

Author: RICHARD G. SCOTT , Source: http://speeches.byu.edu/reader/reader.php?id=7055Saved by mlsscaress in righteous mind heart learning focus prayer feelings essential select 10 years ago[save this] [permalink]

It turns out that there is also a big difference in how number-naming systems in Western and Asian languages are constructed. In English, we say fourteen, sixteen, seventeen, eighteen, and nineteen, so one might expect that we would also say oneteen, twoteen, threeteen, and fiveteen. But we don't. We use a different form: eleven, twelve, thirteen, and fifteen. Similarly, we have forty and sixty, which sound like the words they are related to (four and six). But we also say fifty and thirty and twnty, which sort of sound live five an three and two, but not really. And, for that matter, for numbers above twenty, we put the "decade" first and the unit number second (twenty-one, twenty-two), whereas for the teens, we do it the other way around (fourteen, seventeen, eighteen). The number system in English is highly irregular. Not so in China, Japan and Korea. They have a logical counting system, Eleven is ten-one. Twelve is ten-two. Twenty-four is two-tens-four and so on.


That difference means that Asian children learn to count much faster than American children. Four-year old Chinese children can count, on average, to forty. American children at that age can count only to fifteen, and most don't reach forty until they're five...


"The Asian system is transparent," says Karen Fuson, a Northwestern University psychologist who has closely studied Asian-Western differences. "I think that it makes the whole attitude toward math different. Instead of being a rote learning thing, there's a pattern I can figure out. There is an expectation that it's sensible. For fractions, we say thee-fifths. The Chinese literally "out of five parts, take three.' That's telling you conceptually what a fraction is. It's differentiating the denominator and the numberator."


...When it comes to math, in other words, Asians have a built-in advantage. But it's an unusual kind of advantage. For years, students from China, South Korea, and Japan - and the children of recent immigrants who are from those countries - have substantially outpreformed their Western counterparts at mathematics, and the typical assumption is tha tit has something to do with a kind of innate Asian proclivity for math. The psychologist Richard Lynn has even gone so far as to propose an elaborate evolutionary theory involving the Himalayas, really cold weather, premodern hunting practices, brain size, and specialized vowel sounds to explain why Asians have higher IQs. That's how we think about math. We assume that being good at things like calculus and algebra is a simple function of how smart someone is. But the differences between the number systems in the East and the West suggest something very different - that being good at math may also be rooted in a group's culture.

Author: Malcom Gladwell, Source: Outliers, p. 228-231Saved by mlsscaress in america learning environment culture language capacity math advantage proclivity iq 11 years ago[save this] [permalink]

The learning of man has its limitations. And sometimes, as in our circumstance in rural Mexico, the combined learning of many experts cannot be applied when we need it most. We have to place trust in the Lord.


A chosen occupation is only a means to an end; it is not an end in itself.


The end for which each of you should strive is to be the person that you can become — the person that God wants you to be. The day will come when your professional career will end. . . . The career that you will have labored so hard to achieve — the work that will have supported you and your family — will one day be behind you.


Then you will have learned this great lesson: Much more important than what you have done for a living, is what kind of a person you have become.


Keep learning and preparing for your ultimate graduation day. From time to time ask yourself these questions: 'Am I ready to meet my Maker?' 'Am I worthy of all the blessings He has in store for His faithful children?' 'Have I received my endowment and sealing ordinances of the temple?' 'Have I remained faithful to my covenants?' 'Have I qualified for the greatest of all God's blessings — the blessing of eternal life?'

Author: Elder Russell M. Nelson of the Quorum of the Twelve, Source: http://www.ldschurchnews.com/articles/57233/Trust-the-Lord-Eld...Saved by mlsscaress in character knowledge learning mortality occupation career eternallife spirituality becoming graduation 11 years ago[save this] [permalink]

History and exact science he must learn by laborious reading. Colleges, in like manner, have their indispensable office -- to teach elements. But they can only searve us when they aim not to drill but to create; when they gather from far every ray of various genius to their hospitable halls, and, by the concentrated fires, set the hearts of their youth on flame.

Author: Ralph Waldo Emerson , Source: The American ScholarSaved by cboyack in information education book knowledge learning school study 11 years ago[save this] [permalink]

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