quotes tagged with 'parenting'

“The noblest calling in the world is motherhood. True motherhood is the most beautiful of all arts, the greatest of all professions. She who can paint a masterpiece, or who can write a book that will influence millions, deserve the plaudits and admiration of mankind; but she who rears successfully a family of healthy, beautiful sons and daughters whose immortal souls will exert influence throughout the ages long after paintings shall have faded, and books and statues shall have decayed or been destroyed, deserves the highest honor that man can give, and the choicest blessings of God.”
Author: David O. McKay, Source: unknownSaved by kathrynskaggs in prophet women motherhood parenting lds mormon 8 years ago[save this] [permalink]

Being consistent in our homes is important for another reason. Many of the Savior’s harshest rebukes were directed to hypocrites. Jesus warned His disciples concerning the scribes and Pharisees: “Do not ye after their works: for they say, and do not” (Matthew 23:3). This strong admonition is sobering given the counsel to “express love—and show it,” to “bear testimony—and live it,” and to “be consistent.”


The hypocrisy in our lives is most readily discerned and causes the greatest destruction within our own homes. And children often are the most alert and sensitive when it comes to recognizing hypocrisy.


A public statement of love when the private actions of love are absent at home is hypocrisy—and weakens the foundation of a great work. Publicly declaring testimony when faithfulness and obedience are missing within our own homes is hypocrisy—and undermines the foundation of a great work. The commandment “Thou shalt not bear false witness” (Exodus 20:16) applies most pointedly to the hypocrite in each of us. We need to be and become more consistent. “But be thou an example of the believers, in word, in conversation, in charity, in spirit, in faith, in purity” (1 Timothy 4:12).


As we seek the Lord’s help and in His strength, we can gradually reduce the disparity between what we say and what we do, between expressing love and consistently showing it, and between bearing testimony and steadfastly living it. We can become more diligent and concerned at home as we are more faithful in learning, living, and loving the restored gospel of Jesus Christ.

Author: Elder David A. Bednar , Source: http://lds.org/conference/talk/display/0,5232,23-1-1117-6,00.h...Saved by mlsscaress in spirit faith strength destruction children love parenting home foundation charity purity word disparity alert consistent sensitive hyprocrisy conversatio 10 years ago[save this] [permalink]

For it were not possible that our father, Lehi, could have remembered all these things, to have taught them to his children, except it were for the help of these plates; for he having been taught in the language of the Egyptians therefore he could read these engravings, and teach them to his children, that thereby they could teach them to their children, and so fulfilling the commandments of God, even down to this present time.

Author: King Benjamin, Source: http://scriptures.lds.org/en/mosiah/1/4Saved by rpage in scriptures teaching parenting 10 years ago[save this] [permalink]

You know that your children will read. They will read books and they will read magazines and newspapers. Cultivate within them a taste for the best. While they are very young, read to them the great stories which have become immortal because of the virtues they teach. Expose them to good books. Let there be a corner somewhere in your house, be it ever so small, where they will see at least a few books of the kind upon which great minds have been nourished.

Author: Gordon B. Hinckley, Source: Conference Report, Oct. 1975, 57; or Ensign, Nov. 1975, 39Saved by mlsscaress in read virtue literature parenting family home cultivate library futurehome nourish 10 years ago[save this] [permalink]

You might expect that if you spent such an extended period in twelve different households, what you would gather is twelve different ideas about how to raise children:  there would be the strict parents and the lax parents and the hyperinvolved  parents and the mellow parents and on and on. What Lareau found, however, is something much different. There were only two parenting "philosophies," and they divided almost perfectly along class lines. The wealthier parents raised their kids one way, and the poorer parents raised their kids another way.


The wealthier parents were heavily involved in their children's free time, shuttling them from one activity to the next, quizzing them about their teachers and coaches and teammates... That kind of intensive scheduling was almost entirely absent from the lives of the poor children. (In the poor children's lives) what a child did was considered by his or her parents as something seperate from the adult world and not particularly consequentential.


Lareau calls the middle-class parenting style "concerned cultivation." It's an attempt to actively "foster and assess a child's talents, opinions and skills." Poor parents tend to follow, by contrast, a strategy of "accomplishment of natural growth." They see it as their responsibility to care for their children, but to let them grow and develop on their own.


Lareau stresses that one style isn't morally better than the other. The poorer children were, to her mind, often better behaved, less whiny, more creative in making use of their own time, and had a well-developed sense of independence. But in practical terms, concerted cultivation has enormous advantages. The heavily scheduled middle-class child is exposed to a constantly shifting set of experiences. She learns teamwork and how to cope in highly structured settings. She is taught how to interact comfortably with adults, and to speak up when she needs to....


By contrast the working-class and poor children were characterized by "an emerging sense of distance, distrust, and constraint.

Author: Malcom Gladwell, Source: Outliers, pp.102-104Saved by mlsscaress in children parenting attention focus family home balance involved entitlement adapt indepence 10 years ago[save this] [permalink]

You may have tangible wealth untold; 
Caskets of jewels and coffers of gold. 
Richer than I you could never be- 
I had a mother that read to me

Author: Strickland Gillilan , Source: Best Love PoemsSaved by mlsscaress in reading parenting welth 10 years ago[save this] [permalink]

Children have never been very good at listening to their elders, but they have never failed to imitate them.

Author: James Baldwin, Source: UnknownSaved by Doc in example children parenting model role mentoring 11 years ago[save this] [permalink]

The secret of being a good parent is in the enjoyment of being hated at times, rather than fearing it.

Author: Carl Whitaker, M.D., Source: Cited in Neill, J.R., & Kniskern, D.P. (Eds.). (1982). From psyche to system: The evolving therapy of Carl Whitaker. New York: Guilford Press.Saved by elb1179 in parenting whitaker 11 years ago[save this] [permalink]

A very natural and wonderful consequence of becoming a person capable of great love is described in this passage: “For intelligence cleaveth unto intelligence; wisdom receiveth wisdom; truth embraceth truth; virtue loveth virtue; light cleaveth unto light” (D&C 88:40).


If we pursue the goal of an eternal marriage with purity and with both our hearts and our minds, I believe in most cases we will eventually be rewarded with a companion who is at least our spiritual equal and who will cleave unto intelligence and light as we do, who will receive wisdom as we receive it, who will embrace truth as we embrace it, and who will love virtue as we love it. To spend the eternities with a companion who shares the most important fundamental values with us and who will discuss them, live them, and join in teaching them to children is among the most soul-satisfying experiences of true romantic love. To know that there will be someone who walks a parallel path of goodness and growth with us and yearns for the same eternal values and happiness is of great comfort.

Author: Elder Marlin K. Jensen, Source: http://www.lds.org/ldsorg/v/index.jsp?vgnextoid=2354fccf2b7db0...Saved by mlsscaress in light teaching love parenting marriage intelligence values capacity parallel likeness 11 years ago[save this] [permalink]
Among the old and sacred values to which we should return are the plain and simple principles of the gospel of Jesus Christ. These should be firmly established in our homes to ensure happiness in family life.
President Wilford Woodruff declared: "The Lord has a great many principles in store for us, and the greatest principles which he has for us are the most simple and plain. The first principles of the gospel which lead us unto eternal life are the simplest and yet none are more glorious or important unto us" ("Remarks," Deseret News, 1 Apr. 1857, 27).
It is precisely because these principles are plain and simple that many times they are not considered when there are challenges to face that affect family life. At times we have the tendency to think that the more serious the problem, the bigger and more complex the solution should be. That idea can lead us, for example, to seek help from people or institutions outside the home when in reality the most effective solution will come by applying the glorious principles of the gospel in our homes in the small actions and duties of everyday life. The scriptures remind us "that by small and simple things are great things brought to pass" (Alma 37:6).
Author: Elder Francisco J. Viñas , Source: http://lds.org/conference/talk/display/0,5232,23-1-439-15,00.h...Saved by mlsscaress in happiness parenting family home mother less principles simple firm solutions plain establish enviroment 11 years ago[save this] [permalink]

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