quotes tagged with 'properroleofgovernment'

The proper and limited use of government is to invoke a common justice and keep the peace and that is all.

Author: Leonard Read, Source: UnknownSaved by ImaWriterIII in government peace justice properroleofgovernment leonardread 9 years ago[save this] [permalink]

I cannot subscribe to the omnipotence of a state legislature, or that it is absolute and without control; although its authority should not be expressly restrained by the Constitution, or fundamental law, of the state. The nature, and ends of legislative power will limit the exercise of it. This fundamental principle flows from the very nature of our free Republican governments, that no man should be compelled to do what the laws do not require, nor to refrain from acts which the laws permit. There are acts which the Federal, or State, Legislature cannot do, without exceeding their authority. There are certain vital principles in our free Republican governments, which will determine and overrule an apparent and flagrant abuse of legislative power; as to authorize manifest injustice by positive law; or to take away that security for personal liberty, or private property, for the protection whereof the government was established. An Act of the legislature (for I cannot call it a law) contrary to the great first principles of the social compact, cannot be considered a rightful exercise of legislative authority. The obligation of a law in governments established on express compact, and on republican principles, must be determined by the nature of the power, on which it is founded. A few instances will suffice to explain what I mean. A law that punishes a citizen for an innocent action, or, in other words, for an act, which, when done, was in violation of no existing law; a law that destroys, or impairs, the lawful private contracts of citizens; a law that makes a man a judge in his own cause; or a law that takes property from A and gives it to B. It is against all reason and justice for a people to intrust a Legislature with such powers; and, therefore, it cannot be presumed that they have done it. The genius, the nature and the spirit, of our State Government, amount to a prohibition of such acts of legislation; and the general principles of law and reason forbid them. The legislature may enjoin, permit, forbid, and punish; they may declare new crimes, and establish rules of conduct for all its citizens in future cases; they may command what is right, and prohibit what is wrong; but they cannot change innocence into guilt; or punish innocence as a crime; or violate the right of an antecedent lawful private contract; or the right of private property. To maintain that our Federal, or State, Legislature possesses such powers, if they had not been expressly restrained, would, in my opinion, be a political heresy altogether inadmissible in our free republican governments.

Author: Justice Chase, Source: opinion in Calder v. Bull, 3 Dallas 386-389 (1798).Saved by ImaWriterIII in constitution government legislature properroleofgovernment encroachment judges courtopinion courts 9 years ago[save this] [permalink]

When any court violates the clean and unambiguous language of the Constitution, a fraud is perpetrated and no one is bound to obey it.



(See 16 Ma. Jur. 2d 177, 178)

Author: State v. Sutton, Source: State v. Sutton, 63 Minn. 147, 65 NW 262, 30 L.R.A. 630 Am. St. 459.Saved by ImaWriterIII in constitution government properroleofgovernment courtopinion 9 years ago[save this] [permalink]

Disobedience or evasion of a constitutional mandate may not be tolerated, even though such disobedience may, at least temporarily, promote in some respects the best interests of the public.

Author: State v. Board of Examiners, Source: State v. Board of Examiners, 274 N.Y. 367; 9 NE 2d 12; 112 ALR 660.Saved by ImaWriterIII in constitution government properroleofgovernment courtopinion 9 years ago[save this] [permalink]

Economic necessity cannot justify a disregard of cardinal constitutional guarantee.

Author: Riley v. Carter, Source: Riley v. Carter, 165 Okal. 262; 25 P. 2d 666; 79 ALR 1018.Saved by ImaWriterIII in constitution government properroleofgovernment courtopinion 9 years ago[save this] [permalink]

A long and uniform sanction by law revisers and lawmakers, of a legislative assertion and exercise of power, is entitled to a great weight in construing an ambiguous or doubtful provision, but is entitled to no weight if the statute in question is in conflict with the plain meaning of the constitutional provision.

Author: Kingsley v. Merril, Source: Kingsley v. Merril, 122 Wis. 185; 99 NW 1044.Saved by ImaWriterIII in constitution government properroleofgovernment courtopinion 9 years ago[save this] [permalink]

If the legislature clearly misinterprets a constitutional provision, the frequent repitition of the wrong will not create a right.

Author: Amos v. Mosley, Source: Amos v. Mosley, 74 Fla. 555; 77 So. 619.Saved by ImaWriterIII in constitution government legislature properroleofgovernment courtopinion 9 years ago[save this] [permalink]

Where the words of a constitution are unambiguous and in their commonly received sense lead to a reasonable conclusion, it should be read according to the natural and most obvious import of the framers, without resorting to subtle and forced construction for the purpose of limiting or extending its operation.

Author: A State Ex Rel. Torryson v. Grey, Source: A State Ex Rel. Torryson v. Grey, 21 Nev. 378, 32 P. 190.Saved by ImaWriterIII in constitution government properroleofgovernment courtopinion 9 years ago[save this] [permalink]

It cannot be assumed that the framers of the constitution and the people who adopted it, did not intend that which is the plain import of the language used. When the language of the constitution is positive and free of all ambiguity, all courts are not at liberty, by a resort to the refinements of legal learning, to restrict its obvious meaning to avoid the hardships of particular cases. We must accept the constitution as it reads when its language is unambiguous, for it is the mandate of the sovereign power.

Author: Cook vs. Iverson, Source: Cook vs. Iverson, 122, N.M. 251.Saved by ImaWriterIII in constitution government properroleofgovernment courtopinion 9 years ago[save this] [permalink]

Constitutional provisions for the security of person and property should be liberally construed. It is the duty of the courts to be watchful of constitutional rights against any stealthy encroachments thereon.

Author: Boyd v. U.S., Source: Boyd v. U.S., 116 U.S. 635.Saved by ImaWriterIII in constitution government properroleofgovernment encroachment courtopinion 9 years ago[save this] [permalink]

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