quotes tagged with 'protest'

The true artist can finally articulate a vision of what humanity can trust. In the midst of alienation, the artist can brig community and in the midst of ugliness, beauty. The artist, in short, acts not only as a voice of protest but also as a voice of hope.

Author: Lawrence S. Cunningham, John J. Reich, Source: Culture & Values: A Survey of the Humanities, Vol. 2Saved by wordlovergirl in hope protest community beauty artist alienation ugliness 9 years ago[save this] [permalink]

Today you cannot effectively fight for freedom and not be attacked, and those who think they can are deceiving themselves. While I do not believe in stepping out of the path of duty to pick up a cross I do not need, a man is a coward who refuses to pick up a cross that clearly lies within his path.


A man must not only stand for the right principles, but he must also fight for them. Those who fight for principle can be proud of the friends they've gained and the enemies they've earned.

Author: Ezra Taft Benson, Source: The Christ and the Constitution, God, Family, Country: Our Three Great Loyalties, Deseret Book, 1974, p. 332Saved by cboyack in liberty freedom principle battle activism protest warinheaven 10 years ago[save this] [permalink]
Nonviolence is the answer to the crucial political and moral questions of our time — the need for mankind to overcome oppression and violence without resorting to violence and oppression. Civilization and violence are antithetical concepts… Sooner or later all the people of the world will have to discover a way to live together in peace, and thereby transform this pending cosmic elegy into a creative psalm of brotherhood. If this is to be achieved, man must evolve for all human conflict a method which rejects revenge, aggression and retaliation. The foundation of such a method is love.
Author: Martin Luther King, Jr, Source: Nobel Prize acceptance speech (1964)Saved by Doc in love violence protest revenge brotherhood oppression nonviolence aggression retaliation 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]
In recent years, many seem to have spent their lives protesting. Perhaps they have felt to do this because they have felt repressed or wished to bring about change or have acted out of selfish reasons, thinking that if they tore the house down they might end up with a shingle. Some protesters have said that they have done so in order to be free—free of traditions, free of morals, free of all of the confining standards of society, unrestrained by government or law. Some have been wildly self-indulgent. As Harry Emerson Fosdick (1878–1969) noted, they have “habits that bind them and diseases that curse them and blasted reputations that ruin them.”

Those who have succumbed to this kind of personal disaster often find that the balance in their lives becomes somewhat tilted and uneven. Many people expend far too much precious energy in protesting the rules. Since they did not make the rules, some feel that they should not be restricted by them. Others make a game of testing the fences to see what they can get away with. Some think that by breaking the rules they somehow become stronger or independent. Those who fight the rules spend much time and energy trying to express independence in their quest to find identity. And having traveled far down this road, they find that this is not the road to freedom but to slavery.

Talents, gifts of expression, and precious time are exhausted in swimming against too many tides. I have no hesitancy in suggesting that young men can learn to express themselves better through excellence in the classroom or on the playing field than in gangs or in immoral behavior. Young women can obtain a better identity and receive better notice through academic excellence and artistic expression than through immodesty of dress.

There are times when each of us has to have some gumption to take a stand as to what we wish to preserve or change in order to maintain our self-respect and not be as “a reed shaken with the wind” (Matt. 11:7). We need to take our great stands in life on moral issues and not kick against insignificant matters, appearing to be eccentric or unbalanced or immature. We lose much credibility and strength, and we risk being weighed on an uneven balance, when, Don Quixote–like, we go around “tilting windmills.”
Author: James E. Faust, Source: “The Need for Balance in Our Lives,” Ensign, Mar. 2000, 2Saved by cboyack in rebellion opposition law protest 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]
In a democracy we can renounce war and proclaim peace. There is opportunity for dissent. Many have been speaking out and doing so emphatically. That is their privilege. That is their right, so long as they do so legally.
Author: Gordon B. Hinckley, Source: http://www.lds.org/conference/talk/display/0,5232,89-1-353-27,...Saved by cboyack in war dissent peace protest democracy 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]
To sin by silence when they should protest makes cowards of men.
Author: Abraham Lincoln, Source: UnknownSaved by cboyack in cowardice silence protest 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]

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