quotes tagged with 'sabbath'

We do not go to Sabbath meetings to be entertained or even solely to be instructed. We go to worship the Lord. It is an individual responsibility, and regardless of what is said from the pulpit, if one wishes to worship the Lord in spirit and truth, he may do so by attending his meetings, partaking of the sacrament, and contemplating the beauties of the gospel. If the service is a failure to you, you have failed. No one can worship for you.

Author: President Spencer W. Kimball, Source: “The Sabbath—A Delight,” Ensign, Jan. 1978, 4–5Saved by mlsscaress in self responsibility individual worship decision sacrament sabbath 11 years ago[save this] [permalink]
BYU 21st Stake Goals
STAY ON THE PATH - 1 Nephi 8:20
1 - Study the scriptures each day and read each month's Ensign, seeking to develop spiritual strength & wisdom
2-Pray vocally with sincerity and faith each morning and night, and always have a prayer in your heart.
3-Keep the entire Sabbath day holy, attend all church meetings, and renew your spiritual covenants.
4-Magnify your church callings, fully sustain all others in their callings, and help build the Kingdom of God.
5- Pay tithes and offerings, manage money wisely, avoid materalism and needless debt, and be self-reliant.
6- Attend the temple frequently, keep all temple covenants, and work to unite an seal all members of your family.
7- Earnestly seek to find and love a righteous companion, and worthily prepare to create a strong eternal family.
8- Keep your mind clean and virtuous, and avoid all media that offends and drives away the Spirit.
9- Treat your body as the temple of your spirit, dress modestly, avoid immoral behavior, and maintain good health.
10 - Organize yourself, establish proper priorities, and find way to do good and serve others.
Author: BYU 21st Stake Presidency, Source: Stake Conference BYU21st Stake - October 3 & 4, 2007Saved by mlsscaress in priorities media spirit strength scriptures tithing wisdom magnify behavior love debt materialism family prayer sabbath study less clean health eternal serve ensign vocal virtuous modest organize 12 years ago[save this] [permalink]
The For the Strength of Youth pamphlet is very clear in its call for young women to avoid clothing that is too tight, too short, or improperly revealing in any manner, including bare midriffs. Parents, please review this booklet with your children. Second only to your love, they need your limits. Young women, choose your clothing the way you would choose your friends—in both cases choose that which improves you and would give you confidence standing in the presence of God. Good friends would never embarrass you, demean you, or exploit you. Neither should your clothing.

I make a special appeal regarding how young women might dress for Church services and Sabbath worship. We used to speak of "best dress" or "Sunday dress," and maybe we should do so again. In any case, from ancient times to modern we have always been invited to present our best selves inside and out when entering the house of the Lord—and a dedicated LDS chapel is a "house of the Lord." Our clothing or footwear need never be expensive, indeed should not be expensive, but neither should it appear that we are on our way to the beach. When we come to worship the God and Father of us all and to partake of the sacrament symbolizing the Atonement of Jesus Christ, we should be as comely and respectful, as dignified and appropriate as we can be. We should be recognizable in appearance as well as in behavior that we truly are disciples of Christ, that in a spirit of worship we are meek and lowly of heart, that we truly desire the Savior's Spirit to be with us always.
Author: Elder Jeffrey R. Holland, Source: To Young Women, General Conference October 2005Saved by mlsscaress in spirit worship disciple women clothing respect parents sacrament sabbath appropriate meek 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]
Our leaders urge us to be active in politics—and yet think it very important to keep the Church out of politics. Is this a contradiction? Consider:

Brigham Young encouraged the people to dance, even while proclaiming, "Dancing [is] no part of our worship."43

He says, "I labor for my own dear self," and in the same breath adds that men have no right to work for themselves.44

We practice shrewd economics even while being told to take no thought of what we shall eat or wear.

We should constantly be storing our minds with knowledge, yet take no thought of what we are to say when we teach the gospel.

We are told to be provident and thrifty—but to ask and trust our heavenly Father for our daily bread.

We are told to be industrious and independent, yet "if the laborer in Zion labor for money, he shall perish" (cf. 2 Nephi 26:31).

We are told to go to with our might—and consider the lilies of the field who toil not neither do they spin.

We are told to hold the Sabbath most sacred as a day of rest, yet it is the day on which many of us work hardest.

We are told to acquire worldly learning and told that worldly learning is nothing.

Joseph Smith said he would have nothing to do with politics and ran for president!

The Savior, speaking with the woman at the well, was thirsty and asked for a drink, and even as he was drinking she asked him for a drink, because he told her that he could give her water of which whoever drank would never thirst again.

We could go on and on, but what is wrong here? Nothing. If we were to examine each of the above apparent paradoxes we would find them all falling into the pattern of Moses' declarations, both uttered on the same occasion and as it were in the same breath. First he said, "Now, for this cause I know that man is nothing, which thing I never had supposed" (Moses 1:10). And then he adds: "But now mine own eyes have beheld God; . . . his glory was upon me; and I beheld his face, for I was transfigured before him. . . . I am a son of God, in the similitude of his Only Begotten" (Moses 1:11, 13). Which is it? Is man nothing or everything? It all depends on which existence we behold him in, temporal or eternal.
Author: Hugh Nibley, Source: Brother Brigham Challenges the Saints In the Party, but Not of the Party pp. 105–37Saved by Doc in politics religion potential faith strength work knowledge industry humility learning weakness testimony sabbath temporal thrift eternal childofgod paradox dancing 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]
Sunday is the core of our civilization, dedicated to thought and reverence.
Author: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Source: UnknownSaved by cboyack in sabbath sunday 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]
If we were looking for some program to cure all of the problems that presently beset our world, we might well find it by properly observing the Sabbath day. The importance of the Sabbath is prefigured in the account of creation. In programming the seven creative periods, God set aside the seventh day as his Sabbath. And then in our interests he especially blessed and hallowed this one day out of each week, which he ordained to be our Sabbath day. And what a magnificent day it is when it is used as he intended.
Author: Sterling W. Sill, Source: Conference Report, October 1969, p.16Saved by cboyack in sabbath sunday 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]
Much of the sorrow and distress that is afflicting and will continue to afflict mankind is traceable to the fact that they have ignored [God's] admonition to keep the Sabbath day holy.
Author: George Albert Smith, Source: Conference Report, October 1935, p. 120Saved by cboyack in sabbath sunday 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]

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