quotes tagged with 'strong'

Pain makes you stronger. Fear makes you braver. Heart break makes you wiser. So thank past for a better future. Good morning.

Author: Unknown, Source: http://www.myquotesonlove.com/about/category/good-quotes/good-...Saved by prabatuty in life fear heart future morning past good strong quotes pain wise brave thank 4 years ago[save this] [permalink]

You cannot bring about prosperity by discouraging thrift.
You cannot strengthen the weak by weakening the strong.
You cannot lift the wage earner by pulling down the wage payer.
You cannot help the poor by destroying the rich.
You cannot build character and courage by taking away a man's initiative and independence.
We have met the enemy, and he is us.

Author: Pogo, Source: UnknownSaved by ImaWriterIII in strength character initiative prosperity courage independence enemy enemy strong thrift employee employer pogo 9 years ago[save this] [permalink]

For a moment, think back about your favorite fairy tale. In that story the main character may be a princess or a peasant; she might be a mermaid or a milkmaid, a ruler or a servant. You will find one thing all have in common: they must overcome adversity.


Cinderella has to endure her wicked stepmother and evil stepsisters. She is compelled to suffer long hours of servitude and ridicule.


In “Beauty and the Beast,” Belle becomes a captive to a frightful-looking beast in order to save her father. She sacrifices her home and family, all she holds dear, to spend several months in the beast’s castle.


In the tale “Rumpelstiltskin,” a poor miller promises the king that his daughter can spin straw into gold. The king immediately sends for her and locks her in a room with a mound of straw and a spinning wheel. Later in the story she faces the danger of losing her firstborn child unless she can guess the name of the magical creature who helped her in this impossible task.


In each of these stories, Cinderella, Belle, and the miller’s daughter have to experience sadness and trial before they can reach their “happily ever after.” Think about it. Has there ever been a person who did not have to go through his or her own dark valley of temptation, trial, and sorrow?


Sandwiched between their “once upon a time” and “happily ever after,” they all had to experience great adversity. Why must all experience sadness and tragedy? Why could we not simply live in bliss and peace, each day filled with wonder, joy, and love?


The scriptures tell us there must be opposition in all things, for without it we could not discern the sweet from the bitter. Would the marathon runner feel the triumph of finishing the race had she not felt the pain of the hours of pushing against her limits? Would the pianist feel the joy of mastering an intricate sonata without the painstaking hours of practice?


In stories, as in life, adversity teaches us things we cannot learn otherwise. Adversity helps to develop a depth of character that comes in no other way. Our loving Heavenly Father has set us in a world filled with challenges and trials so that we, through opposition, can learn wisdom, become stronger, and experience joy.

Author: President Dieter F. Uchtdorf , Source: http://www.lds.org/conference/talk/display/0,5232,23-1-1207-40...Saved by mlsscaress in character trial experience wisdom adversity joy strong challenges tragedy triumph fairytale depth 10 years ago[save this] [permalink]

President Thomas S. Monson and those before him have shown us the way. The path is clearly marked, and the pace is steady and strong. You, like Agnes, are being asked to cross the plains. You may not have to give up all your earthly possessions, but the journey to Zion requires that you give up all of your sins so that you may come to know Him—the true and living Christ. You may even be asked to run to the point of exhaustion, but by doing so, the warmth of the Lord’s love will preserve you for the great work yet to come.

Author: Elaine S. Dalton , Source: http://speeches.byu.edu/reader/reader.php?id=12902&x=53&y=6Saved by mlsscaress in work path strong steady preserve pace clear run giveupallyoursins 10 years ago[save this] [permalink]

No matter what our backgrounds or the quality of marriage our grandparents or parents enjoyed, we can in time and with the Lord’s help achieve the ideal. If our heritage includes a spiritually strong family with healthy marriages and close relationships, we will be able to build and even improve on the foundation that has been laid. If our heritage is not as strong, we can resolve that our children will receive a richer legacy.


Above all, I hope that we will vow never to be satisfied with a mediocre marriage. Not long ago a friend told me that one of his young children had asked, “Do you think Grandpa ever kisses Grandma?”


I certainly hope my wife and I are sufficiently in love and demonstrative about it that our grandchildren will not have to wonder. We can never afford to let our relationships become merely mutual toleration or accommodation.


Eternal marriage is godlike marriage. The term eternal describes the quality of marriage as much as its duration.

Author: Elder Marlin K. Jensen, Source: http://www.lds.org/ldsorg/v/index.jsp?vgnextoid=2354fccf2b7db0...Saved by mlsscaress in children marriage foundation strong build eternal legacy close quality healthy improve affectionate demonstrate 12 years ago[save this] [permalink]
The injured should do what they can to work through their trials, and the Savior will “succor his people according to their infirmities.” He will help us carry our burdens. Some injuries are so hurtful and deep that they cannot be healed without help from a higher power and hope for perfect justice and restitution in the next life. Since the Savior has suffered anything and everything that we could ever feel or experience, He can help the weak to become stronger.
Author: Elder James E. Faust, Source: The Atonement: Our Greatest Hope, Liahona, Jan 2002, 19–22. ht...Saved by mlsscaress in work strong atonement carry succor burdens injured weak 12 years ago[save this] [permalink]
The challenge of leadership is to be strong, but not rude; be kind, but not weak; be bold, but not a bully; be thoughtful, but not lazy; be humble, but not timid; be proud, but not arrogant; have humor, but without folly.
Author: Jim Rohn, Source: UnknownSaved by cboyack in character humor leadership humility strong bold 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]

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