quotes tagged with 'suffer'

A soldier is called sometimes to fight, sometimes to die, but always to suffer.

Author: Douglas MacArthur, Source: "Reminiscences"Saved by ImaWriterIII in sacrifice fight war douglasmacarthur suffer soldier death 9 years ago[save this] [permalink]

If you suffer from worry, from grief or shame or jealousy or disappointment or envy, from self-recrimination or self-justification, consider this lesson taught to me many years ago by a patriarch. He was as saintly a man as I have ever known. He was steady and serene, with a deep spiritual strength that many drew upon.


He knew just how to minister to others who were suffering. On a number of occasions I was present when he gave blessings to those who were sick or who were otherwise afflicted. His was a life of service, both to the Church and to his community.


He had presided over one of the missions of the Church and always looked forward to the missionary reunions. When he was older, he was not able to drive at night, and I offered to take him to the reunions. That modest gesture was repaid a thousandfold.


On one occasion, when the Spirit was right, he gave me a lesson for my life from an experience in his own. Although I thought I had known him, he told me things about his life I would not have supposed.


He grew up in a little community with a desire to make something of himself. He struggled to get an education.


He married his sweetheart, and presently everything was just right. He was well employed, with a bright future. They were deeply in love, and she was expecting their first child.


The night the baby was to be born, there were complications. The only doctor was somewhere in the countryside tending to the sick.


After many hours of labor, the condition of the mother-to-be became desperate.


Finally the doctor was located. In the emergency, he acted quickly and soon had things in order. The baby was born and the crisis, it appeared, was over.


Some days later, the young mother died from the very infection that the doctor had been treating at another home that night.


John’s world was shattered. Everything was not right now; everything was all wrong. He had lost his wife. He had no way to tend both the baby and his work.


As the weeks wore on, his grief festered. “That doctor should not be allowed to practice,” he would say. “He brought that infection to my wife. If he had been careful, she would be alive today.”


He thought of little else, and in his bitterness, he became threatening. Today, no doubt, he would have been pressed by many others to file a malpractice suit. And there are lawyers who would see in his pitiable condition only one ingredient—money!


But that was another day, and one night a knock came at his door. A little girl said simply, “Daddy wants you to come over. He wants to talk to you.”


“Daddy” was the stake president. A grieving, heartbroken young man went to see his spiritual leader.


This spiritual shepherd had been watching his flock and had something to say to him.


The counsel from that wise servant was simply, “John, leave it alone. Nothing you do about it will bring her back. Anything you do will make it worse. John, leave it alone.”


My friend told me then that this had been his trial—his Gethsemane. How could he leave it alone? Right was right! A terrible wrong had been committed and somebody must pay for it. It was a clear case.


But he struggled in agony to get hold of himself. And finally, he determined that whatever else the issues were, he should be obedient.


Obedience is powerful spiritual medicine. It comes close to being a cure-all.


He determined to follow the counsel of that wise spiritual leader. He would leave it alone.


Then he told me, “I was an old man before I understood! It was not until I was an old man that I could finally see a poor country doctor—overworked, underpaid, run ragged from patient to patient, with little medicine, no hospital, few instruments, struggling to save lives, and succeeding for the most part.


“He had come in a moment of crisis, when two lives hung in the balance, and had acted without delay.


“I was an old man,” he repeated, “before I finally understood! I would have ruined my life,” he said, “and the lives of others.”


Many times he had thanked the Lord on his knees for a wise spiritual leader who counseled simply, “John, leave it alone.”


And that is the counsel I bring again to you. If you have a festering grudge, if you are involved in an acrimonious dispute, “Behold what the scripture says [and it says it fifty times and more]—man shall not smite, neither shall he judge; for judgment is mine, saith the Lord, and vengeance is mine also, and I will repay” (Morm. 8:20).

Author: Elder Boyd K. Packer, Source: http://www.lds.org/ldsorg/v/index.jsp?vgnextoid=2354fccf2b7db0...Saved by mlsscaress in obedience suffer worry forgiveness trials pain steadfast cure grief brokenheart balmofgilead unexpected 10 years ago[save this] [permalink]

None of us will escape tragedy and suffering. Each of us will probably react differently. However, if we can recall the Lord’s promise, ‘for I the Lord am with you,’ we will be able to face our problems with dignity and courage. We will find the strength to be of good cheer instead of becoming resentful, critical, or defeated. We will be able to meet life’s unpleasant happenings with clear vision, strength, and power. …


What a joy it is to see someone of good cheer, who, when others because of an unpleasant happening or development live in angry silence or vocal disgust, meets the situation with cheerful endurance and good spirit.

Author: Elder Marvin J. Ashton, Source: Conference Report, Apr. 1986, 84–85Saved by mlsscaress in power vision strength disposition cheer courage reaction suffer joy tragedy dignity 11 years ago[save this] [permalink]
Could the Lord have prevented these tragedies? The answer is, Yes. The Lord is omnipotent, with all power to control our lives, save us pain, prevent all accidents, drive all planes and cars, feed us, protect us, save us from labor, effort, sickness, even from death, if he will. But he will not.
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If all the sick for whom we pray were healed, if all the righteous were protected and the wicked destroyed, the whole program of the Father would be annulled and the basic principle of the gospel, free agency, would be ended. No man would have to live by faith.

If joy and peace and rewards were instantaneously given the doer of good, there could be no evil—all would do good but not because of the rightness of doing good. There would be no test of strength, no development of character, no growth of powers, no free agency, only satanic controls.
Author: Spencer W. Kimball, Source: "Tragedy or Destiny," BYU Devotional, December 6, 1995Saved by cboyack in agency evil trial choice suffer tragedy 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]
We came to mortal life to encounter resistance. It was part of the plan for our eternal progress. Without temptation, sickness, pain, and sorrow, there could be no goodness, virtue, appreciation for well-being, or joy.
Author: Howard W. Hunter, Source: “God Will Have a Tried People,” Ensign, May 1980, 25Saved by cboyack in progress adversity suffer sorrow mortality joy 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]
To preserve free agency, the Lord also at times permits the righteous to suffer the consequences of evil acts by others. (See 1 Ne. 18:16.)
Author: Ronald E. Poelman, Source: “Adversity and the Divine Purpose of Mortality,” Ensign, May 1989, 23Saved by cboyack in agency righteous evil suffer consequence 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]
Where there has been sin, there must be suffering.... All of our personal experience confirms the fact that we must endure personal suffering in the process of repentance—and for serious transgressions, that suffering can be severe and prolonged.
Author: Dallin H. Oaks, Source: “Sin and Suffering,” Ensign, July 1992, 70Saved by cboyack in sin suffer repentance 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]
Character cannot be developed in ease and quiet. Only through experience of trial and suffering can the soul be strengthened, ambition inspired, and success achieved.
Author: Helen Keller, Source: UnknownSaved by cboyack in success virtue character trial adversity suffer 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]

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