quotes tagged with 'triumph'

The harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph. What we obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly: it is dearness only that gives every thing its value.

Author: Thomas Paine, Source: The CrisisSaved by mlsscaress in value triumph toil 8 years ago[save this] [permalink]

It is not the critic who counts: not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles or where the doer of deeds could have done better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly, who errs and comes up short again and again, because there is no effort without error or shortcoming, but who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions, who spends himself for a worthy cause; who, at the best, knows, in the end, the triumph of high achievement, and who, at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who knew neither victory nor defeat.

Author: Theodore Roosevelt, Source: "Citizenship in a Republic," Speech at the Sorbonne, Paris, April 23, 1910Saved by ImaWriterIII in fight valiant loyalty blood victory defeat cause cold credit devotion critic triumph sweat timid deeds arena dust marred fallshort theodoreroosevelt 9 years ago[save this] [permalink]

The only thing necessary for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing.

Author: Edmund Burke, Source: UnknownSaved by ImaWriterIII in evil good triumph nothing EdmundBurke 9 years ago[save this] [permalink]

For a moment, think back about your favorite fairy tale. In that story the main character may be a princess or a peasant; she might be a mermaid or a milkmaid, a ruler or a servant. You will find one thing all have in common: they must overcome adversity.


Cinderella has to endure her wicked stepmother and evil stepsisters. She is compelled to suffer long hours of servitude and ridicule.


In “Beauty and the Beast,” Belle becomes a captive to a frightful-looking beast in order to save her father. She sacrifices her home and family, all she holds dear, to spend several months in the beast’s castle.


In the tale “Rumpelstiltskin,” a poor miller promises the king that his daughter can spin straw into gold. The king immediately sends for her and locks her in a room with a mound of straw and a spinning wheel. Later in the story she faces the danger of losing her firstborn child unless she can guess the name of the magical creature who helped her in this impossible task.


In each of these stories, Cinderella, Belle, and the miller’s daughter have to experience sadness and trial before they can reach their “happily ever after.” Think about it. Has there ever been a person who did not have to go through his or her own dark valley of temptation, trial, and sorrow?


Sandwiched between their “once upon a time” and “happily ever after,” they all had to experience great adversity. Why must all experience sadness and tragedy? Why could we not simply live in bliss and peace, each day filled with wonder, joy, and love?


The scriptures tell us there must be opposition in all things, for without it we could not discern the sweet from the bitter. Would the marathon runner feel the triumph of finishing the race had she not felt the pain of the hours of pushing against her limits? Would the pianist feel the joy of mastering an intricate sonata without the painstaking hours of practice?


In stories, as in life, adversity teaches us things we cannot learn otherwise. Adversity helps to develop a depth of character that comes in no other way. Our loving Heavenly Father has set us in a world filled with challenges and trials so that we, through opposition, can learn wisdom, become stronger, and experience joy.

Author: President Dieter F. Uchtdorf , Source: http://www.lds.org/conference/talk/display/0,5232,23-1-1207-40...Saved by mlsscaress in character trial experience wisdom adversity joy strong challenges tragedy triumph fairytale depth 9 years ago[save this] [permalink]

It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly. So that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat.

Author: Theodore Roosevelt (American 26th US President (1901-09), 1858-1919), Source: "Citizenship in a Republic," Speech at the Sorbonne, Paris, Ap...Saved by mlsscaress in enthusiasm effort error error devotion critic triumph strive shortcomings daring spectator player 10 years ago[save this] [permalink]

The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.

Author: Edmund Burke, Source: UnknownSaved by ImaWriterIII in liberty tyranny evil good triumph nothing EdmundBurke EDS 11 years ago[save this] [permalink]
“He who picks up one end of the stick, picks up the other,” my marvelous mission president taught in his very first message to us. And that is the way it is supposed to be when we join this, the true and living Church of the true and living God. When we join The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, we board the Good Ship Zion and sail with her wherever she goes until she comes into that millennial port. We stay in the boat, through squalls and stills, through storms and sunburn, because that is the only way to the promised land. This Church is the Lord’s vehicle for crucial doctrines, ordinances, covenants, and keys that are essential to exaltation, and one cannot be fully faithful to the gospel of Jesus Christ without striving to be faithful in the Church, which is its earthly institutional manifestation. To new convert and longtime member alike, we declare in the spirit of Nephi’s powerful valedictory exhortation: “Ye have entered in by the gate; … [but] now, … after ye have gotten into this strait and narrow path, I would ask if all is done? Behold, I say unto you, Nay; … press forward with a steadfastness in Christ, … and endure to the end, behold, thus … ye shall have eternal life.”

Jesus said, “Without me ye can do nothing.” I testify that that is God’s truth. Christ is everything to us and we are to “abide” in Him permanently, unyieldingly, steadfastly, forever. For the fruit of the gospel to blossom and bless our lives, we must be firmly attached to Him, the Savior of us all, and to this His Church, which bears His holy name. He is the vine that is our true source of strength and the only source of eternal life. In Him we not only will endure but also will prevail and triumph in this holy cause that will never fail us. May we never fail it nor fail Him.
Author: Elder Jeffrey R. Holland, Source: Abide in Me,” Liahona, May 2004, 30–32. http://www.lds.org/lds...Saved by mlsscaress in strength endurance conviction covenants steadfast triumph faithful permanent prevail keys pressforward attached 12 years ago[save this] [permalink]
I learned that courage was not the absence of fear, but the triumph over it. The brave man is not he who does not feel afraid, but he who conquers that fear.
Author: Nelson Mandela, Source: Long Walk to Freedom (1995)bookSaved by Doc in fear courage triumph 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]

« Previous 1 » Next

tag cloud

Visit the tag cloud to see a visual representation of all the tags saved in Quoty.

popular tags