quotes tagged with 'vice'

Vices are simply the errors which a man makes in his search after his own happiness. Unlike crimes, they imply no malice toward others, and no interference with their persons or property.

Author: Lysander Spooner, Source: UnknownSaved by ImaWriterIII in liberty freedom tyranny happiness vice error crime encroachment lysanderspooner encroach interfere 9 years ago[save this] [permalink]
Pangloss, Candide, and Martin, as they were returning to the little farm, met with a good-looking old man, who was taking the air at his door, under an alcove formed of the boughs of orange trees. Pangloss, who was as inquisitive as he was disputative, asked him what was the name of the mufti who was lately strangled. "I cannot tell," answered the good old man; "I never knew the name of any mufti, or vizier breathing. I am entirely ignorant of the event you speak of; I presume that in general such as are concerned in public affairs sometimes come to a miserable end; and that they deserve it: but I never inquire what is doing at Constantinople;
I am contented with sending thither the produce of my garden, which I cultivate with my own hands."

After saying these words, he invited the strangers to come into his house. His two daughters and two sons presented them with divers sorts of sherbet of their own making; besides caymac, heightened with the peels of candied citrons, oranges, lemons, pineapples, pistachio nuts, and Mocha coffee unadulterated with the bad coffee of Batavia or the American islands. After which the two daughters of this good Mussulman perfumed the beards of Candide, Pangloss, and Martin. "You must certainly have a vast estate," said Candide to the Turk.

"I have no more than twenty acres of ground," he replied, "the whole of which I cultivate myself with the help of my children; and our labor keeps off from us three great evils-idleness, vice, and want." Candide, as he was returning home, made profound reflections on the Turk's discourse. "This good old man," said he to Pangloss and Martin, "appears to me to have chosen for himself a lot much preferable to that of the six Kings with whom we had the honor to sup." "Human grandeur," said Pangloss, "is very dangerous, if we believe the testimonies of almost all philosophers; for we find Eglon, King of Moab, was assassinated by Aod; Absalom was hanged by the hair of his head, and run through with three darts; King Nadab, son of Jeroboam, was slain by Baaza; King Ela by Zimri; Okosias by Jehu; Athaliah by Jehoiada; the Kings Jehooiakim, Jeconiah, and Zedekiah, were led into captivity: I need not tell you what was the fate of Croesus, Astyages, Darius, Dionysius of Syracuse, Pyrrhus, Perseus, Hannibal, Jugurtha, Ariovistus, Caesar, Pompey, Nero, Otho, Vitellius, Domitian, Richard II of England, Edward II, Henry VI, Richard Ill, Mary
Stuart, Charles I, the three Henrys of France, and the Emperor Henry IV."

"Neither need you tell me," said Candide, "that we must take care of our garden." "You are in the right," said Pangloss; "for when man was put into the garden of Eden, it was with an intent to dress it; and this proves that man was not born to be idle."
"Work then without disputing," said Martin; "it is the only way to render life supportable."
Author: Voltaire, Source: Candide, p.86-87Saved by mlsscaress in happiness work boredom vice wisdom garden necessity idle pleaures gardenofeden 11 years ago[save this] [permalink]

Could there be among us embryo poets and novelists like Goethe (Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, 1749–1832)? Have we explored as much as we should? Of the creator of Faust, Emerson said, “The old eternal genius that built the world had confided itself more to this man than to any other.” But Goethe was not the greatest nor the last. There may be many Goethes among us even today, waiting to be discovered. Inspired Saints will write great books and novels and biographies and plays.


Can we not find equal talent to those who gave us A Man for All Seasons, Doctor Zhivago, Ben Hur? This latter book I read when a small boy and many times I have returned to it. Critics might not agree with me, but I feel that it is a great story. My Fair Lady and The Sound of Music and such have pleased their millions, but I believe we can improve on them.


We have the great Rembrandt (1606–1669), whose style is original, founded on the work of no other artist, whose coloring is somber and reaches its highest achievement in combinations of browns and grays. There are few paintings about which so much has been written as Rembrandt’s The Night Watch or his self-portraits. His morals also have been subject to criticism.


And we have the Italian painter Raphael (1483–1520), generally accepted in the European world as the greatest of religious painters.


It has been said that many of the great artists were perverts or moral degenerates. In spite of their immorality they became great and celebrated artists. What could be the result if discovery were made of equal talent in men who were clean and free from the vices, and thus entitled to revelations?

Author: President Spencer W. Kimball, Source: http://www.lds.org/ldsorg/v/index.jsp?vgnextoid=2354fccf2b7db0...Saved by mlsscaress in revelation vice talent possibility style new clean originality remarkable masters next greater limitless 11 years ago[save this] [permalink]
Vice is a monster of so frightful mien,
As to be hated needs but to be seen;
Yet seen too oft, familiar with her face,
We first endure, then pity, then embrace.
Author: Alexander Pope, Source: UnknownSaved by richardkmiller in vice desensitization 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]
Work relieves us from three great evils, boredom, vice, and want.
Author: French Proverb, Source: UnknownSaved by cboyack in work boredom vice want 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]
Vice is ignorance. Virtue is knowledge.
Author: Plato, Source: UnknownSaved by cboyack in ignorance virtue vice knowledge 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]
Search others for their virtues, thyself for thy vices.
Author: English Proverb, Source: UnknownSaved by cboyack in virtue vice 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]
Virtue consists, not in abstaining from vice, but in not desiring it.
Author: George Bernard Shaw, Source: UnknownSaved by cboyack in virtue vice 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]
Moderation in temper is always a virtue; but moderation in principle is always a vice.
Author: Thomas Paine, Source: Rights of ManSaved by cboyack in virtue principle vice moderation temper 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]
Work spares us from three evils: boredom, vice, and need.
Author: Voltaire, Source: UnknownSaved by cboyack in work boredom vice need productivity 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]

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