quotes tagged with 'writing'

"Since it is so likely that children will meet cruel enemies, let them at least have heard of brave knights and heroic courage. Otherwise you are making their destiny not brighter but darker."

Author: C.S. Lewis, Source: Essay, "On Three Ways of Writing for Children", 1982, pp. 39-40.Saved by bhquoty in courage children writing 5 years ago[save this] [permalink]

Couldn't write last night: the only thing was to try and forget it all.

Author: Anonymous, Source: Diary of a Nursing Sister on the Western Front, 1914-1915, 42Saved by highflyingbabe in writing shield trauma 8 years ago[save this] [permalink]

the orderlies have a very hard life--and no glory.

Author: Anonymous, Source: Diary of a Nursing Sister on the Western Front, 1914-1915, 37Saved by highflyingbabe in duty writing gender femininity trauma 8 years ago[save this] [permalink]

I had not yet acquired the self-protective callousness of later days, and I put into the writing of my diary that evening an emotion comparable to the feeling of shock and impotent pity that had seized Roland when he found the first dead man from his platoon at the bottom of the trench.

Author: Vera Brittain, Source: Testament of Youth, 176Saved by highflyingbabe in writing shield futility helpless brittain 8 years ago[save this] [permalink]

Had I been able to look into the future and see myself finding platforms accessible long before editors and publishers ceased to be impervious, I should have believed myself destined to die in the interval and waken again to quite another life. And such a fat was perhaps, after all, not so different from the one that actually befell me.

Author: Vera Brittain, Source: Testament of Youth, 73Saved by highflyingbabe in writing youth shield trauma 8 years ago[save this] [permalink]

The mutilated body of the soldier in Testament of Youth looms behind Brittain's hand, touching hers, meeting ours as we turn the pages of the book-each alone.

Author: Santanu Das, Source: Touch and Intimacy in First World War Literature, 228Saved by highflyingbabe in body writing touch wound brittain 8 years ago[save this] [permalink]

The nurse, as well as the reader, is left with a crippling sense of inadequacy.

Author: Santanu Das, Source: Touch and Intimacy in First World War Literature, 219Saved by highflyingbabe in experience writing witness helpless 8 years ago[save this] [permalink]

The detailed, often gruesome, descriptions of wounds that one finds in nurses' memoirs is not only prompted by the weight of memory but is also an attempt to transmit the pain.

Author: Santanu Das, Source: Touch and Intimacy in First World War Literature, 218Saved by highflyingbabe in body knowledge writing horror trauma wound 8 years ago[save this] [permalink]

one of the central problems of both frightful witnessing and representation: the limits of sympathy and language.

Author: Santanu Das, Source: Touch and Intimacy in First World War Literature, 218Saved by highflyingbabe in experience empathy writing witness trauma 8 years ago[save this] [permalink]

the memoirs of the nurses speak to us in a double voice: the exhilaration of service-of taking part in a man's world and actively moulding the course of history through the remaking of the soldiers-often has as its underside the trauma of the helpless witness. If moments of actual physical contact help the nurses to stake their legitimate claim on history and establish a common ground with the soldiers, the recollection of the traumatic moments also serves as faultlines within the text, marking points of ideological rupture.

Author: Santanu Das, Source: Touch and Intimacy in First World War Literature, 203Saved by highflyingbabe in duty experience hospital writing witness trauma wound 8 years ago[save this] [permalink]

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