elb1179's quotes


Anyone who imagines that bliss is normal is going to waste a lot of time running around shouting that he has been robbed.


Most putts don’t drop. Most beef is tough. Most children grow up to be just people. Most successful marriages require a high degree of mutual toleration.


Most jobs are more often dull than otherwise… Life is like an old-time rail journey — delays, sidetracks, smoke, dust, cinders and jolts, interspersed only occasionally by beautiful vistas and thrilling bursts of speed.


The trick is to thank the Lord for letting you have the ride.

Author: Jenkin Lloyd Jones, Source: "Big Rock Candy Mountains," Deseret News, June 12, 1973, A4Saved by elb1179 in life gratitude children tolerance marriage bliss 8 years ago[save this] [permalink]

We must reject the idea that every time a law's broken, society is guilty rather than the lawbreaker. It is time to restore the American precept that each individual is accountable for his actions.

Author: Ronald Reagan, Source: "Excerpts of a Speech by Governor Ronald Reagan, Republican National Convention, Platform Committee Meeting, Miami, Florida," July 31, 1968Saved by elb1179 in accountability blame crime tragedy 9 years ago[save this] [permalink]

Eminent men and able men of great experience and wisdom are blaming the people for looking more and more to the Federal Government to meet their wants and to exercise governmental control over them, and this to the destruction of local self government, the rights of the States, and the rights of the people, all which are the basic factors of our social, economic, and constitutional life.

Might I humbly question whether the people are primarily to blame for this?

Nearly two thousand years ago, on the shores of the Sea of Galilee, the Master miraculously fed 5,000 people. They immediately wished to make Him king. One who could feed them without their working for it, ought to be made their sovereign. This would solve for them the all important problem of earthly existence. Perceiving their thoughts and to avoid being dragged forth as the seeming head of a rebellion, the Master dismissed them and Himself fled their presence, going "up into a mountain apart to pray." That night He crossed over to the other side of the sea , and the multitude learning of it, took ship and also crossed over, and came to Him again. They gathered about Him, deceitfully worshipping, declaring: "Of a truth thou art the Son of God." But He discerning their thought and purpose, reproved them saying: "Ye seek me, not because ye saw the miracles, but because ye did eat of the loaves and were filled."

He then preached the great sermon on the bread of life, and the sacred record declares: "From that time many of his disciples went back and walked no more with him."

He was useless to them, except as the gratuitous provider of their bread and meat.

So do multitudes.

If our Congressmen would stop the march of the people to Washington for their government and their substance, they should cease distributing the loaves and fishes from the steps of the Treasury Building across the road from the White House. You Congressmen have the absolute power to stop it; have you the courage? If it is not done, you, not the people, must take on the censure.

There is one principle as old as human government, indeed as old as human relations: He who holds the purse strings, rules the house, the nation, the world.

If Congressmen wish to restore local self-government, and the rights of the States and of the people, let them send back to the States, to the local communities, to the Churches, and to the children of indigent parents, where it belongs, the duty of caring for their own sick and decrepit and aged, their own unfortunate and underprivileged. Then the march on Washington will cease and the countermarch back home will be a Marathon.

I am not forgetting that this may cost a good many Congressmen considerable inconvenience and more abuse, it may cost some of their them official lives. But they are planning and legislating for the conduct of a war which will cost hundreds of thousands of the actual lives of our best manhood; might they not make an infinitely less sacrifice of their own official lives for the common good and for our free institutions? And I tell you, our free institutions are far more threatened by our domestic usurpations than by the outcome of this war. If you Congressmen would save this nation and its free institutions, cease to appropriate the national funds to meet local wants and problems of welfare.

Author: J. Reuben Clark, Source: October 7, 1943, sourced in Prophets, Principles, and National Survival, p. 354-5Saved by elb1179 in liberty welfare rights christ federalgovernment 10 years ago[save this] [permalink]
The Elders of Israel should "understand that they have something to do with the world politically as well as religiously, that it is as much their duty to study correct political principles as well as religious."
Author: John Taylor, Source: Journal of Discourses, 9:340Saved by elb1179 in politics religion 10 years ago[save this] [permalink]

A very wise man once said, ‘If you look through the rain long enough, you’ll see the rainbow.’ And an even wiser man said, ‘If you’re getting wet, get the hell out of the rain.

Author: Unknown, Source: Found at www.lilianderson.comSaved by elb1179 in humor wisdom realist 10 years ago[save this] [permalink]

Procedures, programs, the administrative policies, even some patterns of organization are subject to change. We are quite free, indeed, quite obliged to alter them from time to time. But the principles, the doctrines, never change. . . .

Author: Boyd K. Packer, Source: “Principles,” Ensign, Mar. 1985, 6, 8Saved by elb1179 in doctrine policy ldschurch 11 years ago[save this] [permalink]

When nothing is sacred, everything is fair game in conflicts of ideas, attitudes, or behaviors. If something is sacred, then some ground rules of harmonious interaction are possible.

Author: Terrance D. Olson, Source: Is Something Sacred? Meridian's Response to Big Love, Meridian...Saved by elb1179 in conflict boundaries sacred arguement 11 years ago[save this] [permalink]

One loves to possess arms, though they hope never to have occasion for them.

Author: Thomas Jefferson , Source: June 19, 1796Saved by elb1179 in peace arms prepared 11 years ago[save this] [permalink]
I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty than to those attending too small a degree of it.
Author: Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826), Source: to Archibald Stuart, 1791Saved by elb1179 in liberty freedom cost 11 years ago[save this] [permalink]

What we obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly: it is dearness only that gives every thing its value.

Author: Thomas Paine, Source: The American Crisis, No. 1, December 19, 1776Saved by elb1179 in sacrifice value cheapness 11 years ago[save this] [permalink]

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