quotes tagged with 'design'

In a universe of blind physical forces and genetic replication, some people are going to get hurt, other people are going to get lucky, and you won’t find any rhyme or reason in it, nor any justice.  The universe we observe has precisely the properties we should expect if there is, at the bottom, no design, no purpose, no evil and no other good.  Nothing but blind, pitiless indifference.  DNA neither knows nor cares.  DNA just is.  And we dance to its music.

Author: Richard Dawkins, Source: as quoted by Ravi Zacharias in "Jesus Among Other Gods," page 114Saved by ImaWriterIII in evil good force universe design what rzquotes absolutes richarddawkins dna 9 years ago[save this] [permalink]
Specialization can easily become a strait-jacket for designers, directing their mental processes towards a predefined goal. It is thus too easy for the architect to assume that the solution to a client’s problem is a new building. Often it is not!
Author: Bryan Lawson, Source: How Designers ThinkSaved by borenmt in creativity design assumptions 12 years ago[save this] [permalink]
This then got me thinking about other examples of muddled thinking... that crop up in the business and design worlds these days (see “MBA Students Have Designs on Innovation” on page 13 of the October 8, 2007 Financial Times). For example: The use of the word “creativity.” Creativity is not a synonym for design. The business community, and some times the design community, too, is quick to imply that design equals creativity. Look it up. It’s not so. Also, the use of the word “innovation.” Same as with creativity; innovation is not a synonym for “design.” Innovation can take place in...accounting or agriculture or...zoology. It doesn’t necessarily have anything to do with design.

Perhaps most annoying: use of the term "design thinking." When the word “critical” is attached to the word “thinking,” the result, “critical thinking,” is a term that has clear, well defined, and well-understood meaning — certainly in the academic community, if not generally. As a counter example, the same cannot, for instance, be said about the term “art thinking.” This is not a term that can be used in any precise or meaningful way. Why? Because it could mean painting or sculpture; it could mean figurative or abstract; it could mean classical or modern or contemporary. Because it embodies so many contradictory notions, it is imprecise to the point of being meaningless — and therefore, completely understandably, it is not much used, if at all.

“Design thinking” is as problematic a term as “art thinking.” Design thinking could refer to architecture, fashion, graphic design, interior design, or product design; it could mean classical or modern or contemporary. It’s imprecise at best and meaningless at worst. More muddled thinking.

In contrast, an example of simple, straightforward, “unmuddled” thinking is Thomas Watson’s dictum "Good design is good business."
Author: Steve Kroeter: president of Archetype Associates, a consulting firm specializing in design management, author of DESIGNnewyork and a former chair of the Design and Management Department at Parsons School of Design, Source: http://www.designobserver.com/archives/029974.htmlSaved by mlsscaress in words meaning creativity message design clear muddled 12 years ago[save this] [permalink]
If a major project is truly innovative, you cannot possibly know its exact cost and its exact schedule at the beginning. And if in fact you do know the exact cost and the exact schedule, chances are that the technology is obsolete.

(Discussing the design of the Grumman lunar module that landed NASA astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin on the moon on July 20, 1969.)
Author: Joseph G. Gavin, Jr., Source: `Fly Me to the Moon: An Interview with Joseph G. Gavin, Jr.'',Saved by mlsscaress in innovation techology obstacles design 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]

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