quotes tagged with 'economy'

Government's view of the economy could be summed up in a few short phrases: If it moves, tax it. If it keeps moving, regulate it. And if it stops moving, subsidize it.

Author: Ronald Reagan, Source: http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/r/ronaldreag109938.ht...Saved by prabatuty in government economy tax regulate subsidize 4 years ago[save this] [permalink]

Our free choice in a competitive society rests on the fact that, if one person refuses to satisfy our wishes, we can turn to another.

Author: Friedrich A. Hayek, Source: UnknownSaved by ImaWriterIII in freedom economy friedrichahayek freesociety 9 years ago[save this] [permalink]

I wish to speak to you about temporal matters.


As a backdrop for what I wish to say, I read to you a few verses from the 41st chapter of Genesis.


Pharaoh, the ruler of Egypt, dreamed dreams which greatly troubled him. The wise men of his court could not give an interpretation. Joseph was then brought before him: “Pharaoh said unto Joseph, In my dream, behold, I stood upon the bank of the river:


“And, behold, there came up out of the river seven kine, fatfleshed and well favoured; and they fed in a meadow:


“And, behold, seven other kine came up after them, poor and very ill favoured and leanfleshed. …“And the lean and the ill favoured kine did eat up the first seven fat kine:


…“And I saw in my dream … seven ears came up in one stalk, full and good:


“And, behold, seven ears, withered, thin, and blasted with the east wind, sprung up after them:


“And the thin ears devoured the seven good ears: …


“And Joseph said unto Pharaoh, … God hath shewed Pharaoh what he is about to do.


“The seven good kine are seven years; and the seven good ears are seven years: the dream is one. …


“… What God is about to do he sheweth unto Pharaoh.


“Behold, there come seven years of great plenty throughout all the land of Egypt:


"And there shall arise after them seven years of famine;


“… And God will shortly bring it to pass” (Gen. 41:17–20, 22–26, 28–30, 32).


Now, brethren, I want to make it very clear that I am not prophesying, that I am not predicting years of famine in the future. But I am suggesting that the time has come to get our houses in order.

Author: President Gordon B. Hinckley, Source: http://tinyurl.com/4pyzraSaved by mlsscaress in freedom wisdom economy debt famine order finances temporal savings feast 11 years ago[save this] [permalink]

So many of our people are living on the very edge of their incomes. In fact, some are living on borrowings.


We have witnessed in recent weeks wide and fearsome swings in the markets of the world. The economy is a fragile thing. A stumble in the economy in Jakarta or Moscow can immediately affect the entire world. It can eventually reach down to each of us as individuals. There is a portent of stormy weather ahead to which we had better give heed.


I hope with all my heart that we shall never slip into a depression. I am a child of the Great Depression of the thirties. I finished the university in 1932, when unemployment in this area exceeded 33 percent.


My father was then president of the largest stake in the Church in this valley. It was before our present welfare program was established. He walked the floor worrying about his people. He and his associates established a great wood-chopping project designed to keep the home furnaces and stoves going and the people warm in the winter. They had no money with which to buy coal. Men who had been affluent were among those who chopped wood.


I repeat, I hope we will never again see such a depression. But I am troubled by the huge consumer installment debt which hangs over the people of the nation, including our own people. In March 1997 that debt totaled $1.2 trillion, which represented a 7 percent increase over the previous year.


In December of 1997, 55 to 60 million households in the United States carried credit card balances. These balances averaged more than $7,000 and cost $1,000 per year in interest and fees. Consumer debt as a percentage of disposable income rose from 16.3 percent in 1993 to 19.3 percent in 1996.


Everyone knows that every dollar borrowed carries with it the penalty of paying interest. When money cannot be repaid, then bankruptcy follows. There were 1,350,118 bankruptcies in the United States last year. This represented a 50 percent increase from 1992. In the second quarter of this year, nearly 362,000 persons filed for bankruptcy, a record number for a three-month period.

Author: President Gordon B. Hinckley, Source: http://tinyurl.com/4pyzraSaved by mlsscaress in depression economy debt famine order finances savings wise feast 11 years ago[save this] [permalink]

It is, parenthetically, a hallmark of free nations that their citizens can discipline themselves today for a better tomorrow. Yet America is in trouble (as are other nations) precisely because a patient persistence in a wise course of public policy is so difficult to attain. Too many impatient politicians buy today's votes with tomorrow's inflation.

Author: Neal A. Maxwell, Source: http://speeches.byu.edu/reader/reader.php?id=6735Saved by cboyack in government nation economy patience patience politician inflation statesman 11 years ago[save this] [permalink]

We are experiencing a serious economic downturn. You read of thousands of layoffs. This may be a difficult season for you. You worry much about your personal affairs. You worry about money. You worry about marriage. You worry about the future.

There may be some lean days ahead for some of you. There may be troubles. None of us can avoid them all. Do not despair. Do not give up. Look for the sunlight through the clouds. Opportunities will eventually open to you. I finished the University of Utah in 1932. It was the very bottom of the most serious depression of modern times. The unemployment rate in Utah was then more than 30 percent. There was much of cynicism. It was a time when men stood in soup lines, and some committed suicide in despair. But somehow we managed to eat and keep going. Opportunities gradually opened, first here and then there. In 1982, I spoke at the fiftieth anniversary of my graduating class. I met there men and women who had become prominent in many undertakings. They had begun almost in poverty. But they kept climbing upward. They had become leaders. They had looked for the positive in life, praying with faith and working with diligence.

Author: President Gordon B. Hinckley , Source: http://lds.org/broadcast/ces090901/transcript/0,11006,566,00.h...Saved by mlsscaress in faith money positive work opportunity begin pray economy future leaders diligence marriage worry sunlight 1932 11 years ago[save this] [permalink]

We must not let our rulers load us with perpetual debt. We must make our election between economy and liberty or profusion and servitude. If we run into such debt, as that we must be taxed in our meat and in our drink, in our necessaries and our comforts, in our labors andour amusements, for our calling and our creeds... [we will] have no time to think, no means of calling our miss-managers to account but be glad to obtain subsistence by hiring ourselves to rivet their chains on the necks of our fellow-sufferers... And this is the tendency of all human governments. A departure from principle in one instance becomes a precedent for [another ]... till the bulk of society  is reduced to be mere automatons of misery... And the fore-horse of this frightful team is public debt. Taxation follows that, and in its train wretchedness and oppression.

Author: Thomas Jefferson, Source: Letter to Samuel Kercheval, Monticello, July 12, 1816 (http://...Saved by jordy in liberty government slavery taxation federalreserve economy debt frugality servitude oppression 11 years ago[save this] [permalink]

Modern-day prophets have pled in plainness for us to avoid "get-rich-quick" schemes if we would avoid the heartaches of financial bondage. Perhaps we have not said enough about the fact that too many of us, in our moments of dreaming of grandeur, plant the seeds of economic disaster. Then at a later date when much is lost, we blame those who participated with us. It is difficult to be of good cheer when self-deceit is our companion. When we willingly expose ourselves to the winds and storms of fraud and scam, we should not be surprised when we come down with deficit disease. Over the years of listening to those who have suffered heavy money losses, I have heard many in desperation declare, "I was taken." Often my heart, mind, and the Spirit have prompted me to share, "Yes, you were taken by yourself." We all need to be encouraged to lift up our heads and see where our thoughts and undeclared priorities are taking us. Self-deceit permits us to blame others for our failures.

Author: Marvin J. Ashton, Source: http://www.lds.org/ldsorg/v/index.jsp?vgnextoid=2354fccf2b7db0...Saved by cboyack in wealth prosperity business economy finances deceit 11 years ago[save this] [permalink]

Many areas of the world have experienced difficult economic times. Businesses have failed, jobs have been lost, and investments have been jeopardized. We must make certain that those for whom we share responsibility do not go hungry or unclothed or unsheltered. When the priesthood of this Church works together as one in meeting these vexing conditions, near miracles take place.

Author: Thomas S. Monson, Source: http://www.lds.org/conference/talk/display/0,5232,23-1-947-20,...Saved by cboyack in economy service charity investment humanitarianaid 11 years ago[save this] [permalink]

When a man feels that he has discovered a social order different from the one that has come into being through the natural tendencies of mankind, he must, perforce, in order to have his invention accepted, paint in the most somber colors the results of the order he seeks to abolish. Therefore, the political theorists to whom I refer, while enthusiastically and perhaps exaggeratedly proclaiming the perfectibility of mankind, fall into the strange contradiction of saying that society is constantly deteriorating. According to them, men are today a thousand times more wretched than they were in ancient times, under the feudal system and the yoke of slavery; the world has become a hell. If it were possible to conjure up the Paris of the tenth century, I confidently believe that such a thesis would prove untenable.

Secondly, they are led to condemn even the basic motive power of human actions—I mean self-interest—since it has brought about such a state of affairs. Let us note that man is made in such a way that he seeks pleasure and shuns pain. From this source, I agree, come all the evils of society: war, slavery, monopoly, privilege; but from this source also come all the good things of life, since the satisfaction of wants and the avoidance of suffering are the motives of human action. The question, then, is to determine whether this motivating force which, though individual, is so universal that it becomes a social phenomenon, is not in itself a basic principle of progress.

In any case, do not the social planners realize that this principle, inherent in man's very nature, will follow them into their new orders, and that, once there, it will wreak more serious havoc than in our natural order, in which one individual's excessive claims and self-interest are at least held in bounds by the resistance of all the others? These writers always assume two inadmissible premises: that society, as they conceive it, will be led by infallible men completely immune to the motive of self-interest; and that the masses will allow such men to lead them.

Finally, our social planners do not seem in the least concerned about the implementation of their program. How will they gain acceptance for their systems? How will they persuade all other men simultaneously to give up the basic motive for all their actions: the impulse to satisfy their wants and to avoid suffering? To do so it would be necessary, as Rousseau said, to change the moral and physical nature of man.

To induce all men, simultaneously, to cast off, like an ill-fitting garment, the present social order in which mankind has evolved since its beginning and adopt, instead, a contrived system, becoming docile cogs in the new machine, only two means, it seems to me, are available: force or universal consent.

Either the social planner must have at his disposal force capable of crushing all resistance, so that human beings become mere wax between his fingers to be molded and fashioned to his whim; or he must gain by persuasion consent so complete, so exclusive, so blind even, that the use of force is made unnecessary.

I defy anyone to show me a third means of setting up and putting into operation a phalanstery or any other artificial social order.

Author: Frederic Bastiat, Source: http://www.econlib.org/library/Bastiat/basHar.htmlSaved by cboyack in society action choice economy force economics politician economist 12 years ago[save this] [permalink]

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