quotes tagged with 'feast'

I wish to speak to you about temporal matters.


As a backdrop for what I wish to say, I read to you a few verses from the 41st chapter of Genesis.


Pharaoh, the ruler of Egypt, dreamed dreams which greatly troubled him. The wise men of his court could not give an interpretation. Joseph was then brought before him: “Pharaoh said unto Joseph, In my dream, behold, I stood upon the bank of the river:


“And, behold, there came up out of the river seven kine, fatfleshed and well favoured; and they fed in a meadow:


“And, behold, seven other kine came up after them, poor and very ill favoured and leanfleshed. …“And the lean and the ill favoured kine did eat up the first seven fat kine:


…“And I saw in my dream … seven ears came up in one stalk, full and good:


“And, behold, seven ears, withered, thin, and blasted with the east wind, sprung up after them:


“And the thin ears devoured the seven good ears: …


“And Joseph said unto Pharaoh, … God hath shewed Pharaoh what he is about to do.


“The seven good kine are seven years; and the seven good ears are seven years: the dream is one. …


“… What God is about to do he sheweth unto Pharaoh.


“Behold, there come seven years of great plenty throughout all the land of Egypt:


"And there shall arise after them seven years of famine;


“… And God will shortly bring it to pass” (Gen. 41:17–20, 22–26, 28–30, 32).


Now, brethren, I want to make it very clear that I am not prophesying, that I am not predicting years of famine in the future. But I am suggesting that the time has come to get our houses in order.

Author: President Gordon B. Hinckley, Source: http://tinyurl.com/4pyzraSaved by mlsscaress in freedom wisdom economy debt famine order finances temporal savings feast 10 years ago[save this] [permalink]

So many of our people are living on the very edge of their incomes. In fact, some are living on borrowings.


We have witnessed in recent weeks wide and fearsome swings in the markets of the world. The economy is a fragile thing. A stumble in the economy in Jakarta or Moscow can immediately affect the entire world. It can eventually reach down to each of us as individuals. There is a portent of stormy weather ahead to which we had better give heed.


I hope with all my heart that we shall never slip into a depression. I am a child of the Great Depression of the thirties. I finished the university in 1932, when unemployment in this area exceeded 33 percent.


My father was then president of the largest stake in the Church in this valley. It was before our present welfare program was established. He walked the floor worrying about his people. He and his associates established a great wood-chopping project designed to keep the home furnaces and stoves going and the people warm in the winter. They had no money with which to buy coal. Men who had been affluent were among those who chopped wood.


I repeat, I hope we will never again see such a depression. But I am troubled by the huge consumer installment debt which hangs over the people of the nation, including our own people. In March 1997 that debt totaled $1.2 trillion, which represented a 7 percent increase over the previous year.


In December of 1997, 55 to 60 million households in the United States carried credit card balances. These balances averaged more than $7,000 and cost $1,000 per year in interest and fees. Consumer debt as a percentage of disposable income rose from 16.3 percent in 1993 to 19.3 percent in 1996.


Everyone knows that every dollar borrowed carries with it the penalty of paying interest. When money cannot be repaid, then bankruptcy follows. There were 1,350,118 bankruptcies in the United States last year. This represented a 50 percent increase from 1992. In the second quarter of this year, nearly 362,000 persons filed for bankruptcy, a record number for a three-month period.

Author: President Gordon B. Hinckley, Source: http://tinyurl.com/4pyzraSaved by mlsscaress in depression economy debt famine order finances savings wise feast 10 years ago[save this] [permalink]
Sisters, I grew up in a single-parent home: a father and two brothers. My mother was gone when I was two. I have no memory. And I had no sister. So what I am about to say I have learned from a queenly wife and from daughters and daughters-in-law. My wife has written a poem which we give to our grandsons when they become old enough for the Aaronic priesthood. Before I quote that, let me say that it is for us a joy to behold and participate with them. She titled it: "The Sacrament Prayer."

The words are repeated once again
this sacred Sabbath time;
words I can trace
through the week,
but this time unique,
spoken,
quietly,
in youthful intonation
and the nourishment
is proffered me
by a boy's hand
in exchange for my changing.

You faithful sisters, married or unmarried, who move daily (and hardly with a break) from the garden plot to the crucial minutia of food labels to the cups and measures of cookery; you, who struggle and preside in the kitchen and keep vigil; you, who reach out to the perennial needs of your family and loved ones; you, who with artistry gather flowers and turn an ordinary table into an altar that summons prayer and thanksgiving; you, who by your very presence, turn eating into a feast--into dining in the name of the Lord, and who, therefore, bring a bountiful measure of grace to your table, lend your faith to boys and sometimes inept men who officiate at the sacrament table. Let the tables turn on your serving. Lend your faith to our trying to act as you do in Christlike dignity. For this is as close as we may ever come to your divine calling to give and to nurture life itself.
Author: Truman G. Madsen, Source: The Savior, the Sacrament, and Self-Worth. http://ce.byu.edu/c...Saved by mlsscaress in faith prepare service home sacrament grace cook eating table altar feast dining 12 years ago[save this] [permalink]

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