quotes tagged with 'wait'

Desperately, helplessly, longingly I cried,
Quietly, patiently, lovingly He replied.
I pled and I wept for a clue to my fate,
And the master said gently, “Child, you must wait.”
LORD, I need answers, I need to know why?
Is your hand shortened or have you not heard?
By faith I have asked and I’m claiming your WORD.
My future and all to which I can relate hangs in the balance,
And you tell me “Wait”?
I’m needing a yes, a go ahead sign or even a no to which I can resign.
And Lord, you’ve promised that if we believe
We need but to ask and we shall receive.
And Lord, I’ve been asking, and this is my cry,
“I’m weary of asking I need a reply.”
And quietly, softly I learned of my fate,
As my master replied once again, “You must wait.”
So I slumped in my chair defeated, and thought and grumbled to God,
And said, “So I’m waiting for what?”
He seemed then to kneel and His eyes met with mine,
And He tenderly said, “I could give you a sign.
I could raise the dead and cause the mountains to run.
All you seek I could give and pleased you would be.
You would have what you want, but you wouldn’t know Me.
You’d not know the depth of My love for each saint,
You would not know the power I give to the faint,
You’d not learn to see through clouds of despair,
You’d not learn to trust just by knowing I’m there,
You’d not know the joy of resting in Me,
When darkness and silence was all you could see.
You would never experience that fullness of love,
As the peace of My Spirit descends like a dove.
You would know that I give, and I save for a start,
But you’d not know the depth of the beat of My heart.
The glow of My comfort late in the night,
The faith that I give when you walk without sight,
The depth that’s beyond getting just what you ask of an infinite God,
Who makes what you have last.
And you never would know should your pain quickly flee,
What it means that “My grace is sufficient for thee.”
Yes, your dreams for that loved one o’er night could come true,
But the loss is you lost what I’m doing in you.
So be silent My child, and in time you will see,
That the greatest of gifts is to get to know me.
And though oft may My answers seem terribly late,
My most precious answer of all is still “Wait!”

Author: Jessica McKinney, Source: UnknownSaved by ImaWriterIII in trust wait providence poem EDS jessicamckinney 9 years ago[save this] [permalink]

We often, like this man and Hamlet, must "take arms against a sea of troubles, and by opposing end them" (Act 3, scene 1, ll. 59–60). And sometimes the cost is very high. It was for Christ, it was for Joseph Smith, and it was for this lone man who counted the cost there in the Potomac--and paid it. It is not easy to go without--without physical gratifications or spiritual assurances or material possessions--but sometimes we must since there is no guarantee of convenience written into our Christian covenant. We must work hard and do right, as Abraham Lincoln said, and sometimes our chance will come. And when we've tried, really tried, and waited for what seemed never to be ours, then "the angels came and ministered unto him." For that ministration in your life I pray in the name of Jesus Christ. Amen.

Author: JEFFREY R. HOLLAND, Source: http://speeches.byu.edu/reader/reader.php?id=6831Saved by mlsscaress in wait covenant effort gratification hardwork cost convenience doright ministration assurances 9 years ago[save this] [permalink]

"If thou be the Son of God, cast thyself down from the pinnacle of this temple."


...The temptation here is even more subtle than the first. It is a temptation of the spirit, of a private hunger more real than the need for bread. Would God save him? Would he? Is Jesus to have divine companionship in this awesome ministry he now begins? He knows that among the children of men only suffering, denunciation, betrayal, and rejection lie ahead. But what about heaven? How alone does a Messiah have to be? Perhaps before venturing forth he ought to get final reassurance. And shouldn't Satan be silenced with his insidious "If, if, if"? Why not get spiritual confirmation, a loyal congregation, and an answer to this imp who heckles--all with one appeal to God's power? Right now. The easy way. Off the temple spire.


But Jesus refuses the temptation of the spirit. Denial and restraint there are also part of divine preparation. He will gain followers, and he will receive reassurance. But not this way. Neither the converts nor the comforts he will so richly deserve have been earned yet. His ministry has hardly begun. The rewards will come by and by. But even the Son of God must wait. The Redeemer who would never bestow cheap grace on others was not likely to ask for any himself.


And so I ask you to be patient in things of the spirit. Perhaps your life has been different from mine, but I doubt it. I have had to struggle to know my standing before God. As a teenager I found it hard to pray and harder to fast. My mission was not easy. I struggled as a student only to find that I had to struggle afterwards, too. In this present assignment I have wept and ached for guidance. It seems no worthy accomplishment has ever come easily for me, and maybe it won't for you--but I'm living long enough to be grateful for that.


It is ordained that we come to know our worth as children of God without something as dramatic as a leap from the pinnacle of the temple. All but a prophetic few must go about God's work in very quiet, very unspectacular ways. And as you labor to know him, and to know that he knows you; as you invest your time--and your convenience--in quiet, unassuming service, you will indeed find that "he shall give his angels charge concerning thee: and in their hands they shall bear thee up" (Matthew 4:6). It may not come quickly. It probably won't come quickly, but there is purpose in the time it takes. Cherish your spiritual burdens because God will converse with you through them and will use you to do his work if you carry them well. Do you recognize this struggle? The date is 14 July 1943.


No peace had yet come, though I had prayed for it almost unceasingly. . . . I turned toward the hills. I had no objective. I wanted only to be alone. I had begun a fast. . . .


My weakness overcame me again. Hot tears came flooding down my cheeks as I made no effort to mop them up. I was accusing myself, and condemning myself and upbraiding myself. I was praying aloud for special blessings from the Lord. I was telling him that I had not asked for this position, that I was incapable of doing the work, that I was imperfect and weak and human, that I was unworthy of so noble a calling, though I had tried hard and my heart had been right. I knew that I must have been at least partly responsible for offenses and misunderstandings which a few people fancied they had suffered at my hands. I realized that I had been petty and small many times. I did not spare myself. A thousand things passed through my mind. Was I called by revelation? . . .


If I could only have the assurance that my call had been inspired most of my other worries would be dissipated. . . .I knew that I must have His acceptance before I could go on. I stumbled up the hill and onto the mountain, as the way became rough. I faltered some as the way became steep. No paths were there to follow; I climbed on and on. Never had I prayed before as I now prayed. What I wanted and felt I must have was an assurance that I was acceptable to the Lord. I told Him that I neither wanted nor was worthy of a vision or appearance of angels or any special manifestation. I wanted only the calm peaceful assurance that my offering was accepted. Never before had I been tortured as I was now being tortured. And the assurance did not come. . . .


I mentally beat myself and chastised myself and accused myself. As the sun came up and moved in the sky I moved with it, lying in the sun, and still I received no relief. I sat up on the cliff and strange thoughts came to me: all this anguish and suffering could be ended so easily from this high cliff and then came to my mind the temptations of the Master when he was tempted to cast Himself down--then I was ashamed for having placed myself in a comparable position and trying to be dramatic. . . . I was filled with remorse because I had permitted myself to place myself . . . in a position comparable, in a small degree, to the position the Saviour found Himself in when He was tempted, and . . . I felt I had cheapened the experiences of the Lord, having compared mine with His. Again I challenged myself and told myself that I was only trying to be dramatic and sorry for myself.


. . . I lay on the cool earth. The thought came that I might take cold, but what did it matter now. There was one great desire, to get a testimony of my calling, to know that it was not human and inspired by ulterior motives, kindly as they might be. How I prayed! How I suffered! How I wept! How I struggled! [Edward L. Kimball and Andrew E. Kimball, Jr., Spencer W. Kimball (Salt Lake City: Bookcraft, 1977), p. 192–95]


Now at this very hour 38 years and a mountain of tumors and troubles later, this sweet and godly man clings to life notbecause that life has been convenient but because he feels there might be one more mountain to climb, one more obstacle of body or spirit that needs to be overcome. The spiritual odyssey of Andrew Kimball's son has been anything but easy. And maybe that of your father's son or your mother's daughter will require patience and perseverance too.


So if your prayers don't always seem answered, take heart. One greater than you or President Kimball cried, "Eli, Eli, lama sabachthani? My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?" (Matthew 27:46). If for a while the harder you try, the harder it gets, take heart. So it has been with the best people who ever lived.

Author: Jeffrey R. Holland was BYU president when this devotional address was given, Source: http://speeches.byu.edu/reader/reader.php?id=6831&x=57&y=9Saved by mlsscaress in denial character worth reward earn wait restraint perseverance patience temptation guidance growth manner feel subtle kimball ache standing unspectacular unassuming answerscapacity 10 years ago[save this] [permalink]
In discussing our various longings for more, I'm not suggesting we adopt Scrooge as a role model for good parenting. I am suggesting that it is important for families and individuals to aggressively seek more of the virtues which go beyond this mortal life. A prayerful, conservative approach is the key to successfully living in an affluent society and building the qualities that come from waiting, sharing, saving, working hard, and making do with what we have. May we be blessed with the desire and the ability to understand when more is really less and when more is better.
Author: Bishop H. David Burton , Source: http://lds.org/conference/talk/display/0,5232,23-1-479-31,00.h...Saved by mlsscaress in success ability society conservative work qualities wait save parenting desire discernment home less build prayerful share more virtues 11 years ago[save this] [permalink]
Before you speak, listen. Before you write, think. Before you spend, earn. Before you invest, investigate. Before you criticize, wait. Before you pray, forgive. Before you quit, try. Before you retire, save. Before you die, give.
Author: William A. Ward, Source: UnknownSaved by cboyack in speak listen write think spend earn invest investigate criticize wait pray forgive quit try retire save die give 13 years ago[save this] [permalink]

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