quotes tagged with 'worry'

No one can make your feel inferior without your consent

Author: Eleanor Roosevelt, Source: https://csqlcache.wordpress.com/2015/12/18/worry-intensifies-your-mind/Saved by prabatuty in depression worry quotes feeling emotional sad sadness 4 years ago[save this] [permalink]

As a cure for worrying, work is better than whiskey

Author: Thomas Edison, Source: http://positivelifequotes.org/best-collection-of-sad-quotes/Saved by prabatuty in work worry quotes cure sad sadness whiskey 4 years ago[save this] [permalink]

Today is the tomorrow you worried about yesterday.

Author: Anonymous, Source: UnknownSaved by ImaWriterIII in worry today anonymous tomorrow yesterday 9 years ago[save this] [permalink]

He who worries about calamities suffers them twice over.

Author: Og Mandino, Source: UnknownSaved by Jacob in worry 10 years ago[save this] [permalink]

If you suffer from worry, from grief or shame or jealousy or disappointment or envy, from self-recrimination or self-justification, consider this lesson taught to me many years ago by a patriarch. He was as saintly a man as I have ever known. He was steady and serene, with a deep spiritual strength that many drew upon.


He knew just how to minister to others who were suffering. On a number of occasions I was present when he gave blessings to those who were sick or who were otherwise afflicted. His was a life of service, both to the Church and to his community.


He had presided over one of the missions of the Church and always looked forward to the missionary reunions. When he was older, he was not able to drive at night, and I offered to take him to the reunions. That modest gesture was repaid a thousandfold.


On one occasion, when the Spirit was right, he gave me a lesson for my life from an experience in his own. Although I thought I had known him, he told me things about his life I would not have supposed.


He grew up in a little community with a desire to make something of himself. He struggled to get an education.


He married his sweetheart, and presently everything was just right. He was well employed, with a bright future. They were deeply in love, and she was expecting their first child.


The night the baby was to be born, there were complications. The only doctor was somewhere in the countryside tending to the sick.


After many hours of labor, the condition of the mother-to-be became desperate.


Finally the doctor was located. In the emergency, he acted quickly and soon had things in order. The baby was born and the crisis, it appeared, was over.


Some days later, the young mother died from the very infection that the doctor had been treating at another home that night.


John’s world was shattered. Everything was not right now; everything was all wrong. He had lost his wife. He had no way to tend both the baby and his work.


As the weeks wore on, his grief festered. “That doctor should not be allowed to practice,” he would say. “He brought that infection to my wife. If he had been careful, she would be alive today.”


He thought of little else, and in his bitterness, he became threatening. Today, no doubt, he would have been pressed by many others to file a malpractice suit. And there are lawyers who would see in his pitiable condition only one ingredient—money!


But that was another day, and one night a knock came at his door. A little girl said simply, “Daddy wants you to come over. He wants to talk to you.”


“Daddy” was the stake president. A grieving, heartbroken young man went to see his spiritual leader.


This spiritual shepherd had been watching his flock and had something to say to him.


The counsel from that wise servant was simply, “John, leave it alone. Nothing you do about it will bring her back. Anything you do will make it worse. John, leave it alone.”


My friend told me then that this had been his trial—his Gethsemane. How could he leave it alone? Right was right! A terrible wrong had been committed and somebody must pay for it. It was a clear case.


But he struggled in agony to get hold of himself. And finally, he determined that whatever else the issues were, he should be obedient.


Obedience is powerful spiritual medicine. It comes close to being a cure-all.


He determined to follow the counsel of that wise spiritual leader. He would leave it alone.


Then he told me, “I was an old man before I understood! It was not until I was an old man that I could finally see a poor country doctor—overworked, underpaid, run ragged from patient to patient, with little medicine, no hospital, few instruments, struggling to save lives, and succeeding for the most part.


“He had come in a moment of crisis, when two lives hung in the balance, and had acted without delay.


“I was an old man,” he repeated, “before I finally understood! I would have ruined my life,” he said, “and the lives of others.”


Many times he had thanked the Lord on his knees for a wise spiritual leader who counseled simply, “John, leave it alone.”


And that is the counsel I bring again to you. If you have a festering grudge, if you are involved in an acrimonious dispute, “Behold what the scripture says [and it says it fifty times and more]—man shall not smite, neither shall he judge; for judgment is mine, saith the Lord, and vengeance is mine also, and I will repay” (Morm. 8:20).

Author: Elder Boyd K. Packer, Source: http://www.lds.org/ldsorg/v/index.jsp?vgnextoid=2354fccf2b7db0...Saved by mlsscaress in obedience suffer worry forgiveness trials pain steadfast cure grief brokenheart balmofgilead unexpected 11 years ago[save this] [permalink]

When I take a small pebble and place it directly in front of my eye, it takes on the appearance of a mighty boulder. It is all I can see. It becomes all-consuming-like the problems of a loved one that affect our lives every waking moment. When the things you realistically can do to help are done, leave the matter in the hands of the Lord and worry no more. Do not feel guilty because you cannot do more. Do not waste your energy on useless worry. The Lord will take the pebble that fills your vision and cast it down among the challenges you will face in your eternal progress. It will then be seen in perspective. In time, you will feel impressions and know how to give further help. You will find more peace and happiness, will not neglect others that need you, and will be able to give greater help because of that eternal perspective.

Author: Richard G. Scott, Source: unknownSaved by charkartch in worry 11 years ago[save this] [permalink]

We are experiencing a serious economic downturn. You read of thousands of layoffs. This may be a difficult season for you. You worry much about your personal affairs. You worry about money. You worry about marriage. You worry about the future.

There may be some lean days ahead for some of you. There may be troubles. None of us can avoid them all. Do not despair. Do not give up. Look for the sunlight through the clouds. Opportunities will eventually open to you. I finished the University of Utah in 1932. It was the very bottom of the most serious depression of modern times. The unemployment rate in Utah was then more than 30 percent. There was much of cynicism. It was a time when men stood in soup lines, and some committed suicide in despair. But somehow we managed to eat and keep going. Opportunities gradually opened, first here and then there. In 1982, I spoke at the fiftieth anniversary of my graduating class. I met there men and women who had become prominent in many undertakings. They had begun almost in poverty. But they kept climbing upward. They had become leaders. They had looked for the positive in life, praying with faith and working with diligence.

Author: President Gordon B. Hinckley , Source: http://lds.org/broadcast/ces090901/transcript/0,11006,566,00.h...Saved by mlsscaress in faith money positive work opportunity begin pray economy future leaders diligence marriage worry sunlight 1932 11 years ago[save this] [permalink]

There is more to life than increasing it's speed

Author: ghandi, Source: cheryl SmithSaved by Doc in life worry anxiety hurry 11 years ago[save this] [permalink]

Worry is the interest paid by those who borrow trouble.

Author: George Washington, Source: unknownSaved by bluesfreak in worry trouble 11 years ago[save this] [permalink]
Do not confuse the preoccupation of worry and anxiety with the preoccupation involved in exercising faith. When your mind is prone to dwell on the adverse consequences of events which you assume you have very little control over, that is worry. In contrast, if your mind dwells on the possible consequences of various courses of action which you will control to a great extent, you are exercising faith.
Author: Grant Von Harrison, Source: Drawing on The Powers of Heaven, p.35Saved by mlsscaress in faith positive worry anxiety decisions answers thinking analyze 12 years ago[save this] [permalink]

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